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      Effective Encapsulation of C 60 by Metal–Organic Frameworks with Polyamide Macrocyclic Linkers

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          The chemistry and applications of metal-organic frameworks.

          Crystalline metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are formed by reticular synthesis, which creates strong bonds between inorganic and organic units. Careful selection of MOF constituents can yield crystals of ultrahigh porosity and high thermal and chemical stability. These characteristics allow the interior of MOFs to be chemically altered for use in gas separation, gas storage, and catalysis, among other applications. The precision commonly exercised in their chemical modification and the ability to expand their metrics without changing the underlying topology have not been achieved with other solids. MOFs whose chemical composition and shape of building units can be multiply varied within a particular structure already exist and may lead to materials that offer a synergistic combination of properties.
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            Design and synthesis of an exceptionally stable and highly porous metal-organic framework

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              Mesoporous silica nanoparticles: synthesis, biocompatibility and drug delivery.

              In the past decade, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have attracted more and more attention for their potential biomedical applications. With their tailored mesoporous structure and high surface area, MSNs as drug delivery systems (DDSs) show significant advantages over traditional drug nanocarriers. In this review, we overview the recent progress in the synthesis of MSNs for drug delivery applications. First, we provide an overview of synthesis strategies for fabricating ordered MSNs and hollow/rattle-type MSNs. Then, the in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility and biotranslocation of MSNs are discussed in relation to their chemophysical properties including particle size, surface properties, shape, and structure. The review also highlights the significant achievements in drug delivery using mesoporous silica nanoparticles and their multifunctional counterparts as drug carriers. In particular, the biological barriers for nano-based targeted cancer therapy and MSN-based targeting strategies are discussed. We conclude with our personal perspectives on the directions in which future work in this field might be focused. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
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                Journal
                Angewandte Chemie International Edition
                Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.
                Wiley
                1433-7851
                1521-3773
                May 03 2021
                March 31 2021
                May 03 2021
                : 60
                : 19
                : 10814-10819
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Departamento de Quimica Organica Facultad de Quimica Regional Campus of International Excellence “Campus Mare Nostrum” Universidad de Murcia 30100 Murcia Spain
                [2 ]Seccion Universitaria de Instrumentacion Científica (SUIC) Area Cientifica y Tecnica de Investigacion (ACTI) Universidad de Murcia 30100 Murcia Spain
                Article
                10.1002/anie.202100996
                bd28ab97-6ec0-48b3-91a5-57a3a45388ff
                © 2021

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1


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