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      A mid-brunhes climatic event: long-term changes in global atmosphere and ocean circulation.

      Science (New York, N.Y.)

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          Abstract

          A long-term climatic change 4.0 x 10(5) to 3.0 x 10(5) years ago is recorded in deep-sea sediments of the Angola and Canary basins in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. In the Angola Basin (Southern Hemisphere) the climatic signal shows a transition to more humid ("interglacial") conditions in equatorial Africa, and in the Canary Basin (Northern Hemisphere) to more "glacial" oceanic conditions. This trend is confirmed by comparison with all well-documented marine and continental records from various latitudes available; in the Northern Hemisphere, in the Atlantic north of 20 degrees N, climate merged into more "glacial" conditions and in equatorial regions and in the Southern Hemisphere to more "interglacial" conditions. The data point to a more northern position of early Brunhes oceanic fronts and to an intensified atmosphere and ocean surface circulation in the Southern Hemisphere during that time, probably accompanied by a more zonal circulation in the Northern Hemisphere. The mid-Brunhes climatic change may have been forced by the orbital eccentricity cycle of 4.13 x 10(5) years.

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          Journal
          17781412
          10.1126/science.232.4750.619

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