0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Acute Effects of Estradiol Pretreatment on the Response to d-Amphetamine in Women

      ,  

      Neuroendocrinology

      S. Karger AG

      Behaviour, Clinical neuroendocrinology, Gonadal steroids, Menstrual cycle, Amphetamines

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Little is known about the interactions between ovarian hormones and responses to psychoactive drugs in humans. Preclinical studies suggest that ovarian hormones such as estrogen and progesterone have direct and indirect central nervous system actions and that these hormones can influence behavioral responses to psychoactive drugs. In the present study, we assessed the subjective and physiological effects of d-amphetamine (AMPH; 10 mg p.o.) after pretreatment with estradiol. Two groups of healthy, regularly cycling women participated in two sessions scheduled during the early follicular phases of two menstrual cycles. One group received estradiol patches (Estraderm TTS; 0.8 mg) which elevated plasma estradiol levels to approximately 750 pg/ml on both sessions; the other group received placebo patches on both sessions. Both groups received AMPH (10.0 mg) and placebo in a randomized and counterbalanced order on the two sessions. Dependent measures included self-report questionnaires, physiological measures, and plasma hormone levels. Most of the subjective and physiological effects of AMPH were not affected by acute estradiol treatment. Nevertheless, estradiol pretreatment increased the magnitude of the effects of AMPH on subjective ratings of ‘pleasant stimulation’ and decreased ratings of ‘want more’. Also, estradiol produced some subjective effects when administered alone: It increased subjective ratings of ‘feel drug’, ‘energy and intellectual efficiency’, and ‘pleasant stimulation’. These results provide limited evidence that the stimulating effects of AMPH are increased by acute estradiol pretreatment.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 11

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Sex differences in the rapid and acute effects of estrogen on striatal D2 dopamine receptor binding.

          Regional changes in striatal D2 dopamine (DA) receptor binding in castrated (CAST) or ovariectomized (OVX) rats were investigated following administration of a low dose of estradiol benzoate (EB), repeated treatment with EB followed by progesterone, or vehicle. In two separate experiments, there was a significant decrease in striatal D2 DA receptor binding in caudal striatum from OVX, but not CAST rats 30 min after a single injection of EB. In CAST rats, there was a significant increase in striatal D2 DA receptor binding in rostral striatum 4 h after injection of EB. There was no effect of EB plus progesterone treatment in either OVX or CAST rats. In addition, CAST rats had significantly lower D2 DA receptor binding in the lateral region of the rostral striatum than did OVX rats. These results show sexually dimorphic and regionally specific effects of estrogen on striatal D2 DA receptor binding, and a significant sex difference in striatal D2 DA receptor binding in the absence of circulating gonadal hormones. The present findings are discussed in light of previous reports of sex differences in gonadal hormone influences on striatal DA mediated behaviors.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Acute effects of d-amphetamine during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle in women.

            Little is known about the interactions between ovarian hormones across the menstrual cycle and responses to psychoactive drugs in humans. Preclinical studies suggest that ovarian hormones such as estrogen and progesterone have direct and indirect central nervous system actions, and that these hormones can influence behavioral responses to psychoactive drugs. In the present study, we assessed the subjective and behavioral effects of d-amphetamine (AMPH; 15 mg orally) at two hormonally distinct phases of the menstrual cycle in women. Sixteen healthy women received AMPH or placebo capsules during the follicular and mid-luteal phases of their cycle. During the follicular phase, estrogen levels are low initially and then rise while progesterone levels remain low. During the midluteal phase, levels of both estrogen and progesterone are relatively high. Dependent measures included self-report questionnaires, physiological measures and plasma hormone levels. Although there were no baseline differences in mood during the follicular or luteal phase, the effects of AMPH were greater during the follicular phase than the luteal phase. During the follicular phase, subjects reported feeling more "High", "Energetic and Intellectually Efficient", and "Euphoric" after AMPH than during the luteal phase, and also reported liking and wanting AMPH more. Further analyses showed that during the follicular phase, but not the luteal phase, responses to AMPH were related to levels of estrogen. Higher levels of estrogen were associated with greater AMPH-induced increases in "Euphoria" and "Energy and Intellectual Efficiency". During the luteal phase, in the presence of both estrogen and progesterone, estrogen levels were not related to the effects of AMPH. These findings suggest that estrogen may enhance the subjective responses to a stimulant drug in women, but that this effect may be masked in the presence of progesterone.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Sex differences and estrous cycle variations in amphetamine-elicited rotational behavior.

              The experiments reported here were designed to determine if there are sex- and/or estrus cycle-dependent differences in amphetamine (AMPH)-elicited rotational behavior in unlesioned rats. Whole brain or striatal levels of AMPH produced by systemic administration of the drug were also measured. At all doses tested (1.0-10.0 mg/kg) systemic administration of AMPH resulted in significantly higher brain levels of AMPH in females than in males. A systemic dose was then calculated which produced equivalent brain levels of AMPH in males and females. Even with equivalent brain levels of AMPH, males produced significantly fewer net rotations than females in estrus, diestrus 2, or proestrus. In female rats the brain levels of AMPH produced by systemic administration did not vary with the estrous cycle. However, the amount of AMPH-elicited rotational behavior did. On the day of estrus, female produced significantly more net rotations than they did 24 h later, on the day of diestrus 1. It is suggested that sex and estrous cycle dependent differences in rotational behavior may be due to the direct or indirect modulation of mesostriatal dopamine activity by gonadal steroid hormone.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                NEN
                Neuroendocrinology
                10.1159/issn.0028-3835
                Neuroendocrinology
                S. Karger AG
                0028-3835
                1423-0194
                2000
                January 2000
                14 January 2000
                : 71
                : 1
                : 51-59
                Affiliations
                Department of Psychiatry, University of Chicago, Ill., USA
                Article
                54520 Neuroendocrinology 2000;71:51–59
                10.1159/000054520
                10644899
                © 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 3, Tables: 2, References: 31, Pages: 9
                Categories
                Gonadotropins and Gonadal Steroids

                Comments

                Comment on this article