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      Music as Consolation—The Importance of Music at Farewells and Mourning

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          Abstract

          In this study we examined a case where twelve participants conducted farewell ceremonies for their deceased relatives. Taking a qualitative approach, we used interviews and questionnaires to focus on life stories that involve grieving. Specifically, we asked about experiences of the grief process as related to choice of music. Our results indicate that the role of music in farewell rituals is important for the grieving process in several ways. Firstly, music was associated with positive memories of the loved one and gave rise to experiences of recognition. Secondly, music facilitated active participation in the grieving process through choosing farewell music together with a relative. Thirdly, selecting music for the funeral in advance, together with their loved ones, was also experienced as hopeful, comforting and consoling before, during and after the bereavement.

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          Most cited references34

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          Music therapy with imminently dying hospice patients and their families: Facilitating release near the time of death

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            Music as therapy in early history

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              Fibromyalgia patients' own experiences of video self-interpretation: a phenomenological-hermeneutic study.

              Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a disorder with musculoskeletal pain as well as many other psychological and physical symptoms. Up-to-date treatment strategies for this disorder often have only limited effects. In order to develop more effective and adequate treatment tools, a phenomenological-hermeneutic study inspired by Paul Ricoeur was used. FMS patients viewed themselves on videotapes. After the video sessions the FMS patients were interviewed about thoughts that were triggered when they saw themselves on videotape. Video interpretation in combination with interviews facilitated a communication and understanding between the patient and therapist about the patients' body and self-image. The results showed that with the help of video interpretation, the patients' body and self-awareness could be improved, which in turn may help therapists to find better treatment tools for a more directed and individually adapted treatment. This is of importance as this method can be useful to FMS patients for early identification of maladaptive movement patterns and for a better integration their body and self-image. By allowing the FMS patients to interpret themselves from videotape, the FMS patients become more aware of both body and self-signals, which make it easier for the clinician/therapist to know where to start to work with each patients' specific rehabilitation programme.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                OMEGA - Journal of Death and Dying
                Omega (Westport)
                SAGE Publications
                0030-2228
                1541-3764
                May 2022
                July 12 2020
                May 2022
                : 85
                : 1
                : 155-177
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Music, Pedagogy and Society, Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden
                [2 ]Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
                [3 ]Center for Social Sustainability, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
                Article
                10.1177/0030222820942391
                bd4c1b63-c478-4e6c-b190-6fa58c7a3726
                © 2022

                http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license


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