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      The Effect of Telling Lies on Belief in the Truth

      research-article
      * , a ,
      Europe's Journal of Psychology
      PsychOpen
      lying, lies, inflation, memory, deception

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          Abstract

          The current study looks at the effect of telling lies, in contrast to simply planning lies, on participants’ belief in the truth. Participants planned and told a lie, planned to tell a lie but didn’t tell it, told an unplanned lie, or neither planned nor told a lie (control) about events that did not actually happen to them. Participants attempted to convince researchers that all of the stories told were true. Results show that telling a lie plays a more important role in inflating belief scores than simply preparing the script of a lie. Cognitive dissonance may lead to motivated forgetting of information that does not align with the lie. This research suggests that telling lies may lead to confusion as to the veracity of the lie leading to inflated belief scores.

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          Most cited references28

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          Reality monitoring.

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            Interpersonal Deception Theory

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              Development, reliability, and validity of a dissociation scale.

              Dissociation is a lack of the normal integration of thoughts, feelings, and experiences into the stream of consciousness and memory. Dissociation occurs to some degree in normal individuals and is thought to be more prevalent in persons with major mental illnesses. The Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) has been developed to offer a means of reliably measuring dissociation in normal and clinical populations. Scale items were developed using clinical data and interviews, scales involving memory loss, and consultations with experts in dissociation. Pilot testing was performed to refine the wording and format of the scale. The scale is a 28-item self-report questionnaire. Subjects were asked to make slashes on 100-mm lines to indicate where they fall on a continuum for each question. In addition, demographic information (age, sex, occupation, and level of education) was collected so that the connection between these variables and scale scores could be examined. The mean of all item scores ranges from 0 to 100 and is called the DES score. The scale was administered to between 10 and 39 subjects in each of the following populations: normal adults, late adolescent college students, and persons suffering from alcoholism, agoraphobia, phobic-anxious disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, and multiple personality disorder. Reliability testing of the scale showed that the scale had good test-retest and good split-half reliability. Item-scale score correlations were all significant, indicating good internal consistency and construct validity. A Kruskal-Wallis test and post hoc comparisons of the scores of the eight populations provided evidence of the scale's criterion-referenced validity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                EJOP
                Eur J Psychol
                Europe's Journal of Psychology
                Eur. J. Psychol.
                PsychOpen
                1841-0413
                30 November 2017
                : 13
                : 4
                : 633-644
                Affiliations
                [a ]Central Washington University, Ellensburg, WA, USA
                [2]Webster University Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
                Author notes
                [* ]Department of Psychology, MS#7575, Central Washington University, 400 E. University Way, Ellensburg, WA 98926, USA. polaged@ 123456cwu.edu
                Article
                ejop.v13i4.1422
                10.5964/ejop.v13i4.1422
                5763454
                bda14695-a148-4e7a-94a0-32f0eb382188
                Copyright @ 2017

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) 3.0 License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                History
                : 21 March 2017
                : 24 May 2017
                Categories
                Research Reports

                Psychology
                inflation,memory,lying,deception,lies
                Psychology
                inflation, memory, lying, deception, lies

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