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      Audience synchronies in live concerts illustrate the embodiment of music experience

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          Abstract

          A study of 132 audience members of three classical public concerts (all three staged the same chamber music pieces by Ludwig van Beethoven, Brett Dean, and Johannes Brahms) had the goal of analyzing the physiological and motor responses of audiences. It was assumed that the music would induce synchronous physiology and movement in listeners (induction synchrony). In addition to hypothesizing that such synchronies would be present, we expected that they were linked to participants’ aesthetic experiences, their affect and personality traits, which were assessed by questionnaires before and after the concerts. Clear evidence was found of physiological synchrony (heart rate, respiration rate, skin conductance response) as well as movement synchrony of the audiences, whereas breathing behavior was not synchronized. Thus the audiences of the three concerts resonated with the music, their music perception was embodied. There were links between the bodily synchrony and aesthetic experiences: synchrony, especially heart-rate synchrony, was higher when listeners felt moved emotionally and inspired by a piece, and were immersed in the music. Personality traits were also associated with the individual contributions to induction synchrony.

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          Most cited references45

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          Measuring personality in one minute or less: A 10-item short version of the Big Five Inventory in English and German

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            A continuous measure of phasic electrodermal activity

            Electrodermal activity is characterized by the superposition of what appear to be single distinct skin conductance responses (SCRs). Classic trough-to-peak analysis of these responses is impeded by their apparent superposition. A deconvolution approach is proposed, which separates SC data into continuous signals of tonic and phasic activity. The resulting phasic activity shows a zero baseline, and overlapping SCRs are represented by predominantly distinct, compact impulses showing an average duration of less than 2 s. A time integration of the continuous measure of phasic activity is proposed as a straightforward indicator of event-related sympathetic activity. The quality and benefit of the proposed measure is demonstrated in an experiment with short interstimulus intervals as well as by means of a simulation study. The advances compared to previous decomposition methods are discussed.
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              Nonverbal synchrony in psychotherapy: coordinated body movement reflects relationship quality and outcome.

              The authors quantified nonverbal synchrony--the coordination of patient's and therapist's movement--in a random sample of same-sex psychotherapy dyads. The authors contrasted nonverbal synchrony in these dyads with a control condition and assessed its association with session-level and overall psychotherapy outcome. Using an automated objective video analysis algorithm (Motion Energy Analysis; MEA), the authors calculated nonverbal synchrony in (n = 104) videotaped psychotherapy sessions from 70 Caucasian patients (37 women, 33 men, mean age = 36.5 years, SD = 10.2) treated at an outpatient psychotherapy clinic. The sample was randomly drawn from an archive (N = 301) of routinely videotaped psychotherapies. Patients and their therapists assessed session impact with self-report post-session questionnaires. A battery of pre- and postsymptomatology questionnaires measured therapy effectiveness. The authors found that nonverbal synchrony is higher in genuine interactions contrasted with pseudointeractions (a control condition generated by a specifically designed shuffling procedure). Furthermore, nonverbal synchrony is associated with session-level process as well as therapy outcome: It is increased in sessions rated by patients as manifesting high relationship quality and in patients experiencing high self-efficacy. Higher nonverbal synchrony characterized psychotherapies with higher symptom reduction. The results suggest that nonverbal synchrony embodies the patients' self-reported quality of the relationship and further variables of therapy process. This hitherto overlooked facet of therapeutic relationships might prove useful as an indicator of therapy progress and outcome. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                wolfgang.tschacher@unibe.ch
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                5 October 2023
                5 October 2023
                2023
                : 13
                : 14843
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.5734.5, ISNI 0000 0001 0726 5157, University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, , University of Bern, ; Bern, Switzerland
                [2 ]GRID grid.49791.32, ISNI 0000 0001 1464 7559, Zeppelin University, ; Friedrichshafen, Germany
                [3 ]Illposed, Zurich, Switzerland
                [4 ]GRID grid.461782.e, ISNI 0000 0004 1795 8610, Max-Planck-Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, ; Frankfurt am Main, Germany
                [5 ]GRID grid.507521.4, ISNI 0000 0001 2196 6742, Applied University for Music, ; Karlsruhe, Germany
                Article
                41960
                10.1038/s41598-023-41960-2
                10556000
                37798262
                be03eecf-b3c2-40e0-8463-98251a35c1a7
                © Springer Nature Limited 2023

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                History
                : 5 December 2022
                : 4 September 2023
                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001663, Volkswagen Foundation;
                Award ID: „Experimental Concert Research“
                Award ID: „Experimental Concert Research“
                Award ID: „Experimental Concert Research“
                Award ID: „Experimental Concert Research“
                Award ID: „Experimental Concert Research“
                Award ID: „Experimental Concert Research“
                Award ID: „Experimental Concert Research“
                Award ID: „Experimental Concert Research“
                Award Recipient :
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100021742, Aventis Foundation;
                Award ID: „Experimental Concert Research“
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © Springer Nature Limited 2023

                Uncategorized
                autonomic nervous system,applied mathematics,human behaviour
                Uncategorized
                autonomic nervous system, applied mathematics, human behaviour

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