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      Temperature influence on pathogen transmission and subsequent mortalities in juvenile Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas

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      Aquaculture Environment Interactions

      Inter-Research Science Center

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          Detection and description of a particular Ostreid herpesvirus 1 genotype associated with massive mortality outbreaks of Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, in France in 2008.

          Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infections have been reported around the world and are associated with high mortalities of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas). In the summer 2008, abnormal mortality rates ranging from 80% to 100% were reported in France and affected only Pacific oysters. Analyses of oyster samples collected during mortality outbreaks demonstrated a significant detection of OsHV-1 (75% of analysed batches), which appeared stronger than previous years. DNA sequencing based on C and IA regions was carried out on 28 batches of OsHV-1 infected Pacific oysters collected in 2008. Polymorphisms were described in both the C and IA regions and characterized a genotype of OsHV-1 not already reported and termed OsHV-1 microVar. A microsatellite zone present in the C region showed several deletions. Additionally, 44 isolates collected in France and in the USA, from 1995 to 2007 were sequenced and compared to the 2008 sequences. The analyses of 76 sequences showed OsHV-1 microVar detection only in 2008 isolates. These data suggest that OsHV-1 microVar can be assumed as an emergent genotype. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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            Vibrio infections triggering mass mortality events in a warming Mediterranean Sea.

            Mass mortality events of benthic invertebrates in the temperate north-western (NW) Mediterranean Sea have been observed in recent seasons. A 16 month in situ study in the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean Sea) demonstrated that the occurrence of Paramuricea clavata mortality episodes were concomitant to a condition of prolonged high sea surface temperatures, low chlorophyll concentrations and the presence of culturable Vibrio spp. in seawater. The occurrence of Vibrio spp. at the seasonal scale was correlated with temperature; with few vibrios retrieved on specific media when the temperature dropped below 18 degrees C and a sharp increase of vibrios abundance (up to 3.4 x 10(4) MPN l(-1)) when the temperature was greater than or equal to 22 degrees C. Phylogenetic and phenotypic analysis of Vibrio isolates associated with healthy and diseased P. clavata colonies collected during a mortality episode showed that these bacteria were significantly more abundant in diseased than in healthy corals and were related to the V. harveyi, V. splendidus and V. coralliilyticus groups, the latter only identified in diseased organisms. Inoculation of bacterial isolates from these groups onto healthy P. clavata in aquaria caused disease signs and death in a range of Vibrio concentrations, temperature values and trophic conditions consistent with those recorded in the field. It is concluded that Vibrio infections may act as an additional triggering mechanism of mass mortality events in the coastal Mediterranean Sea and that their occurrence is climate-linked. Predicted global warming leading to long-lasting hot summer periods together with stratification resulting in energetic constraints represent a major threat to the survival of benthic invertebrates in the temperate NW Mediterranean Sea due to potential disease outbreak associated with Vibrio pathogens.
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              Bacterial disease in marine bivalves, a review of recent studies: Trends and evolution

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Aquaculture Environment Interactions
                Aquacult. Environ. Interact.
                Inter-Research Science Center
                1869-215X
                1869-7534
                June 04 2013
                June 04 2013
                : 3
                : 3
                : 257-273
                Article
                10.3354/aei00070
                © 2013
                Product

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