23
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      The population genetics of structural variants in grapevine domestication

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references52

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found
          Is Open Access

          The grapevine genome sequence suggests ancestral hexaploidization in major angiosperm phyla.

          The analysis of the first plant genomes provided unexpected evidence for genome duplication events in species that had previously been considered as true diploids on the basis of their genetics. These polyploidization events may have had important consequences in plant evolution, in particular for species radiation and adaptation and for the modulation of functional capacities. Here we report a high-quality draft of the genome sequence of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) obtained from a highly homozygous genotype. The draft sequence of the grapevine genome is the fourth one produced so far for flowering plants, the second for a woody species and the first for a fruit crop (cultivated for both fruit and beverage). Grapevine was selected because of its important place in the cultural heritage of humanity beginning during the Neolithic period. Several large expansions of gene families with roles in aromatic features are observed. The grapevine genome has not undergone recent genome duplication, thus enabling the discovery of ancestral traits and features of the genetic organization of flowering plants. This analysis reveals the contribution of three ancestral genomes to the grapevine haploid content. This ancestral arrangement is common to many dicotyledonous plants but is absent from the genome of rice, which is a monocotyledon. Furthermore, we explain the chronology of previously described whole-genome duplication events in the evolution of flowering plants.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A draft sequence of the rice genome (Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica).

            J. Yu (2002)
            We have produced a draft sequence of the rice genome for the most widely cultivated subspecies in China, Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica, by whole-genome shotgun sequencing. The genome was 466 megabases in size, with an estimated 46,022 to 55,615 genes. Functional coverage in the assembled sequences was 92.0%. About 42.2% of the genome was in exact 20-nucleotide oligomer repeats, and most of the transposons were in the intergenic regions between genes. Although 80.6% of predicted Arabidopsis thaliana genes had a homolog in rice, only 49.4% of predicted rice genes had a homolog in A. thaliana. The large proportion of rice genes with no recognizable homologs is due to a gradient in the GC content of rice coding sequences.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Toward better understanding of artifacts in variant calling from high-coverage samples.

              Heng Li (2014)
              Whole-genome high-coverage sequencing has been widely used for personal and cancer genomics as well as in various research areas. However, in the lack of an unbiased whole-genome truth set, the global error rate of variant calls and the leading causal artifacts still remain unclear even given the great efforts in the evaluation of variant calling methods. We made 10 single nucleotide polymorphism and INDEL call sets with two read mappers and five variant callers, both on a haploid human genome and a diploid genome at a similar coverage. By investigating false heterozygous calls in the haploid genome, we identified the erroneous realignment in low-complexity regions and the incomplete reference genome with respect to the sample as the two major sources of errors, which press for continued improvements in these two areas. We estimated that the error rate of raw genotype calls is as high as 1 in 10-15 kb, but the error rate of post-filtered calls is reduced to 1 in 100-200 kb without significant compromise on the sensitivity. BWA-MEM alignment and raw variant calls are available at http://bit.ly/1g8XqRt scripts and miscellaneous data at https://github.com/lh3/varcmp. hengli@broadinstitute.org Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Plants
                Nat. Plants
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                2055-0278
                September 2019
                September 9 2019
                September 2019
                : 5
                : 9
                : 965-979
                Article
                10.1038/s41477-019-0507-8
                31506640
                beccba03-c17a-402f-90d9-33d87fd17ee3
                © 2019

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article