9
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares

      A peer-reviewed international annual journal devoted to the history of psychology, and especially to the interconnection between historiographic survey and problems of epistemology. To submit to this journal, click here

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      William James and Dr Carus

      research-article
      European Yearbook of the History of Psychology
      Brepols Publishers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          During his stay in Dresden in 1867, William James consulted a Dr Carus. The 1920 edition of James’ letters identifies him as the famous physician, psychologist, and painter Carl Gustav Carus. The 1995 edition of James’ correspondence erroneously takes him to be ‘an unidentified physician’ in Berlin. Most probably James consulted not the famous Dr Carus but his son, Albert Gustav Carus, the identification of the 1920 edition constituting a case of what R. K. Merton called the Matthew effect.

          Related collections

          Most cited references1

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Carl Gustav Carus als Arzt in Dresden

          A. Scholz (2009)
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Journal
            EYHP
            eyhp
            European Yearbook of the History of Psychology
            Brepols Publishers
            2295-5267
            2507-0304
            January 2016
            : 2
            : 79-85
            Article
            10.1484/J.EYHP.5.112943
            bece3b23-cb87-4256-82f3-85b18e573de0
            History

            Psychology,Anthropology,Clinical Psychology & Psychiatry
            Psychology, Anthropology, Clinical Psychology & Psychiatry

            Comments

            Comment on this article