2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
2 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Callosobruchus phaseoli (Gyllenhal, 1833) (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae): a new invasive species in Kazakhstan

      ,

      Acta Biologica Sibirica

      Pensoft Publishers

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          An invasive seed-beetle species cowpea weevil Callosobruchus phaseoli (Gyllenhal, 1833), was found in the south-eastern Kazakhstan (Almaty city) for the first time. Its areal includes India (species origin), South and Central America, Europe, Middle East (Israel), North Africa, Arabian Peninsula, Far East, China, Japan, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Burma, Philippines, Hawaiian Islands, Australia, and Oceania. Damaged plants are adzuki bean Vigna angularis (Willd.) Ohwi & H. Ohashi (1969), mung bean Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilczek, broad bean Vicia faba Linnaeus, 1753, pea Pisum sativum Linnaeus, 1753, pigeon pea Cajanus cajan (L.) Huth, 1893, hyacinth bean Lablab purpureus (L.) Sweet, 1826, Wisteria sp., lima bean Phaseolus lunatus Linnaeus, 1753, common bean Phaseolus vulgaris Linnaeus, 1753 and other species of beans, chickpea Cicer arietinum Linnaeus, 1753, Sesbania sp., rattlepod Crotalaria spectabilis Roth., lupine Lupinus sp. Emerged beetles immediately mate and begin to lay eggs on the same day. Beetle damage both in field and in storage. We were not able to find the species during the monitoring of agriculture lands and natural landscapes near the city. We assumed that the invasion occurred recently and the species did not have time to spread outside Almaty. Since C. phaseoli was discovered in Almaty, which is a transit crossroad for many trade routes, further species distribution should be predicted. The most probable corridor for further invasion of cowpea weevil in Kazakhstan is the south and southeast parts of the country, namely Almaty, Zhambyl, Turkestan, and Kyzylorda oblast's.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 3

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Evolutionary diversification of the bean beetle genus Callosobruchus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae): traits associated with stored-product pest status.

          Despite the fact that many plant-feeding insects are pests, little effort has been made to identify key evolutionary trait transitions that allow taxa to acquire or lose pest status. A large proportion of species in the genus Callosobruchus are economically important pests of stored, dry postharvest beans of the tribe Phaseoleae. However, the evolution of this feeding habit is poorly understood. Here, we present a reconstruction of the phylogeny of the Asian and African Callosobruchus based on three mitochondrial genes, and assess which traits have been associated with the evolutionary origin or loss of ability to reproduce on dry beans. Our phylogenetic analysis showed that species group into the chinensis and the maculatus clades, which are also supported by genital morphology, and an additional paraphyletic group. Ancestral ability to use dry beans has been lost in the chinensis clade but acquired again in C. chinensis. Dry-bean use and host-plant use were both phylogenetically constrained and transitions in the two were significantly correlated. Host shifts from the subtribe Phaseolinae to Cajaninae were more common than the reverse and were more likely in species using young beans. The ability to use dry beans was more likely gained when using Phaseolinae hosts and promoted habitat shifts from tropical to temperate regions. Adaptation to arid climate was also associated with the ability to reproduce on dry beans and on Phaseolinae. Thus, our analysis suggests that physiological adaptations to an arid climate and to Phaseolinae hosts both render beetles predisposed to become pests of cultivated beans.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Leaf and Seed Beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae). Chapter 8.3

            The inventory of the leaf and seed beetles alien to Europe revealed a total of 25 species of which 14 seed beetles (bruchids) and 11 leaf beetles mostly belonging to the subfamilies Alticinae and Chrysomelinae. At present, aliens account for 9.4% of the total fauna of seed beetles in Europe whereas this percentage is less than 1% for leaf beetles. Whilst seed beetles dominated the introductions in Europe until 1950, there has been an exponential increase in the rate of arrival of leaf beetles since then. New leaf beetles arrived at an average rate of 0.6 species per year during the period 2000–2009. Most alien species originated from Asia but this pattern is mainly due to seed beetles of which a half are of Asian origin whereas leaf beetles predominantly originated from North America (36.4%). Unlike other insect groups, a large number of alien species have colonized most of Europe. All but one species have been introduced accidentally with either the trade of beans or as contaminants of vegetal crops or stowaway. Most aliens presently concentrate in man-made habitats but little affect natural habitats (<6%). Highly negative economic impacts have been recorded on stored pulses of legumes and crops but very little is known about possible ecological impact.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The genera of seed beetles (Coleoptera, Bruchidae)

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Acta Biologica Sibirica
                ABS
                Pensoft Publishers
                2412-1908
                July 23 2020
                July 23 2020
                : 6
                : 87-92
                Article
                10.3897/abs.6.e53070
                © 2020

                Comments

                Comment on this article