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      Colorectal cancer screening for average-risk adults: 2018 guideline update from the American Cancer Society : ACS Colorectal Cancer Screening Guideline

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          Cancer statistics, 2018

          Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths that will occur in the United States and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. Incidence data, available through 2014, were collected by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program; the National Program of Cancer Registries; and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data, available through 2015, were collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. In 2018, 1,735,350 new cancer cases and 609,640 cancer deaths are projected to occur in the United States. Over the past decade of data, the cancer incidence rate (2005-2014) was stable in women and declined by approximately 2% annually in men, while the cancer death rate (2006-2015) declined by about 1.5% annually in both men and women. The combined cancer death rate dropped continuously from 1991 to 2015 by a total of 26%, translating to approximately 2,378,600 fewer cancer deaths than would have been expected if death rates had remained at their peak. Of the 10 leading causes of death, only cancer declined from 2014 to 2015. In 2015, the cancer death rate was 14% higher in non-Hispanic blacks (NHBs) than non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) overall (death rate ratio [DRR], 1.14; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.13-1.15), but the racial disparity was much larger for individuals aged <65 years (DRR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.29-1.32) compared with those aged ≥65 years (DRR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.06-1.09) and varied substantially by state. For example, the cancer death rate was lower in NHBs than NHWs in Massachusetts for all ages and in New York for individuals aged ≥65 years, whereas for those aged <65 years, it was 3 times higher in NHBs in the District of Columbia (DRR, 2.89; 95% CI, 2.16-3.91) and about 50% higher in Wisconsin (DRR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.56-2.02), Kansas (DRR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.25-1.81), Louisiana (DRR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.38-1.60), Illinois (DRR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.39-1.57), and California (DRR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.38-1.54). Larger racial inequalities in young and middle-aged adults probably partly reflect less access to high-quality health care. CA Cancer J Clin 2018;68:7-30. © 2018 American Cancer Society.
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            GRADE guidelines: 1. Introduction-GRADE evidence profiles and summary of findings tables.

            This article is the first of a series providing guidance for use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system of rating quality of evidence and grading strength of recommendations in systematic reviews, health technology assessments (HTAs), and clinical practice guidelines addressing alternative management options. The GRADE process begins with asking an explicit question, including specification of all important outcomes. After the evidence is collected and summarized, GRADE provides explicit criteria for rating the quality of evidence that include study design, risk of bias, imprecision, inconsistency, indirectness, and magnitude of effect. Recommendations are characterized as strong or weak (alternative terms conditional or discretionary) according to the quality of the supporting evidence and the balance between desirable and undesirable consequences of the alternative management options. GRADE suggests summarizing evidence in succinct, transparent, and informative summary of findings tables that show the quality of evidence and the magnitude of relative and absolute effects for each important outcome and/or as evidence profiles that provide, in addition, detailed information about the reason for the quality of evidence rating. Subsequent articles in this series will address GRADE's approach to formulating questions, assessing quality of evidence, and developing recommendations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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              Colorectal cancer statistics, 2017.

              Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in the United States. Every 3 years, the American Cancer Society provides an update of CRC incidence, survival, and mortality rates and trends. Incidence data through 2013 were provided by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, the National Program of Cancer Registries, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data through 2014 were provided by the National Center for Health Statistics. CRC incidence rates are highest in Alaska Natives and blacks and lowest in Asian/Pacific Islanders, and they are 30% to 40% higher in men than in women. Recent temporal patterns are generally similar by race and sex, but differ by age. Between 2000 and 2013, incidence rates in adults aged ≥50 years declined by 32%, with the drop largest for distal tumors in people aged ≥65 years (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.50; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.48-0.52) and smallest for rectal tumors in ages 50 to 64 years (male IRR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85-0.96; female IRR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.93-1.08). Overall CRC incidence in individuals ages ≥50 years declined from 2009 to 2013 in every state except Arkansas, with the decrease exceeding 5% annually in 7 states; however, rectal tumor incidence in those ages 50 to 64 years was stable in most states. Among adults aged <50 years, CRC incidence rates increased by 22% from 2000 to 2013, driven solely by tumors in the distal colon (IRR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.13-1.35) and rectum (IRR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.13-1.31). Similar to incidence patterns, CRC death rates decreased by 34% among individuals aged ≥50 years during 2000 through 2014, but increased by 13% in those aged <50 years. Progress against CRC can be accelerated by increasing initiation of screening at age 50 years (average risk) or earlier (eg, family history of CRC/advanced adenomas) and eliminating disparities in high-quality treatment. In addition, research is needed to elucidate causes for increasing CRC in young adults. CA Cancer J Clin 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:177-193. © 2017 American Cancer Society.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians
                CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians
                American Cancer Society
                00079235
                May 30 2018
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Associate Professor and Attending Physician, University of Virginia School of Medicine; Charlottesville VA
                [2 ]Emeritus Professor, Louisiana State University School of Public Health; New Orleans LA
                [3 ]Professor, University of Minnesota and Masonic Cancer Center; Minneapolis MN
                [4 ]Professor and Attending Physician, Emory University School of Medicine and Winship Cancer Institute; Atlanta GA
                [5 ]Associate Professor of Medicine of the Perelman School of Medicine and Attending Physician, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center; Philadelphia PA
                [6 ]Independent retired physician and patient advocate, University of Washington and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Seattle WA
                [7 ]Biostatistician, University of Washington and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Seattle WA
                [8 ]Professor and Director, Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine; Emory University School of Medicine; Atlanta GA
                [9 ]Professor and Director of the Duke Center for Onco-Primary Care, Durham, NC
                [10 ]Professor, Health Services Research; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Houston TX
                [11 ]Professor and Attending Physician, University of California, San Francisco and San Francisco VA Medical Center; San Francisco CA
                [12 ]Director, Cancer Control Department; American Cancer Society; Atlanta GA
                [13 ]Chief Medical and Scientific Officer and Executive Vice President-Research, American Cancer Society; Atlanta GA
                [14 ]Vice President, Cancer Control Interventions, Cancer Control Department; American Cancer Society; Atlanta GA
                [15 ]Strategic Director for Risk Factor Screening and Surveillance, American Cancer Society; Atlanta GA
                [16 ]Strategic Director, Surveillance Information Services; American Cancer Society; Atlanta GA
                [17 ]Chief Cancer Control Officer, American Cancer Society; Atlanta GA
                [18 ]Vice President, Cancer Screening, Cancer Control Department; American Cancer Society; Atlanta GA.
                10.3322/caac.21457
                © 2018

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