0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Multisubstrate DNA stable isotope probing reveals guild structure of bacteria that mediate soil carbon cycling

      , , ,

      Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

      Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Soil microorganisms determine the fate of soil organic matter (SOM), and their activities compose a major component of the global carbon (C) cycle. We employed a multisubstrate, DNA-stable isotope probing experiment to track bacterial assimilation of C derived from distinct sources that varied in bioavailability. This approach allowed us to measure microbial contributions to SOM processing by measuring the C assimilation dynamics of diverse microorganisms as they interacted within soil. We identified and tracked 1,286 bacterial taxa that assimilated 13C in an agricultural soil over a period of 48 d. Overall 13C-assimilation dynamics of bacterial taxa, defined by the source and timing of the 13C they assimilated, exhibited low phylogenetic conservation. We identified bacterial guilds composed of taxa that had similar 13C assimilation dynamics. We show that C-source bioavailability explained significant variation in both C mineralization dynamics and guild structure, and that the growth dynamics of bacterial guilds differed significantly in response to C addition. We also demonstrate that the guild structure explains significant variation in the biogeographical distribution of bacteria at continental and global scales. These results suggest that an understanding of in situ growth dynamics is essential for understanding microbial contributions to soil C cycling. We interpret these findings in the context of bacterial life history strategies and their relationship to terrestrial C cycling.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 88

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Introducing mothur: open-source, platform-independent, community-supported software for describing and comparing microbial communities.

          mothur aims to be a comprehensive software package that allows users to use a single piece of software to analyze community sequence data. It builds upon previous tools to provide a flexible and powerful software package for analyzing sequencing data. As a case study, we used mothur to trim, screen, and align sequences; calculate distances; assign sequences to operational taxonomic units; and describe the alpha and beta diversity of eight marine samples previously characterized by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments. This analysis of more than 222,000 sequences was completed in less than 2 h with a laptop computer.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Predictive functional profiling of microbial communities using 16S rRNA marker gene sequences

            Profiling phylogenetic marker genes, such as the 16S rRNA gene, is a key tool for studies of microbial communities but does not provide direct evidence of a community’s functional capabilities. Here we describe PICRUSt (Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States), a computational approach to predict the functional composition of a metagenome using marker gene data and a database of reference genomes. PICRUSt uses an extended ancestral-state reconstruction algorithm to predict which gene families are present and then combines gene families to estimate the composite metagenome. Using 16S information, PICRUSt recaptures key findings from the Human Microbiome Project and accurately predicts the abundance of gene families in host-associated and environmental communities, with quantifiable uncertainty. Our results demonstrate that phylogeny and function are sufficiently linked that this ‘predictive metagenomic’ approach should provide useful insights into the thousands of uncultivated microbial communities for which only marker gene surveys are currently available.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Development of a dual-index sequencing strategy and curation pipeline for analyzing amplicon sequence data on the MiSeq Illumina sequencing platform.

              Rapid advances in sequencing technology have changed the experimental landscape of microbial ecology. In the last 10 years, the field has moved from sequencing hundreds of 16S rRNA gene fragments per study using clone libraries to the sequencing of millions of fragments per study using next-generation sequencing technologies from 454 and Illumina. As these technologies advance, it is critical to assess the strengths, weaknesses, and overall suitability of these platforms for the interrogation of microbial communities. Here, we present an improved method for sequencing variable regions within the 16S rRNA gene using Illumina's MiSeq platform, which is currently capable of producing paired 250-nucleotide reads. We evaluated three overlapping regions of the 16S rRNA gene that vary in length (i.e., V34, V4, and V45) by resequencing a mock community and natural samples from human feces, mouse feces, and soil. By titrating the concentration of 16S rRNA gene amplicons applied to the flow cell and using a quality score-based approach to correct discrepancies between reads used to construct contigs, we were able to reduce error rates by as much as two orders of magnitude. Finally, we reprocessed samples from a previous study to demonstrate that large numbers of samples could be multiplexed and sequenced in parallel with shotgun metagenomes. These analyses demonstrate that our approach can provide data that are at least as good as that generated by the 454 platform while providing considerably higher sequencing coverage for a fraction of the cost.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                Proc Natl Acad Sci USA
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                0027-8424
                1091-6490
                November 19 2021
                November 23 2021
                November 19 2021
                November 23 2021
                : 118
                : 47
                : e2115292118
                Article
                10.1073/pnas.2115292118
                bf28ceef-43b5-4ecd-9716-a6e25883469e
                © 2021

                Comments

                Comment on this article