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          Methodological nationalism and beyond: nation-state building, migration and the social sciences

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            Politicized Places: Explaining Where and When Immigrants Provoke Local Opposition

            In ethnic and racial terms, America is growing rapidly more diverse. Yet attempts to extend racial threat hypotheses to today's immigrants have generated inconsistent results. This article develops the politicized places hypothesis, an alternative that focuses on how national and local conditions interact to construe immigrants as threatening. Hostile political reactions to neighboring immigrants are most likely when communities undergo sudden influxes of immigrants and when salient national rhetoric reinforces the threat. Data from several sources, including twelve geocoded surveys from 1992 to 2009, provide consistent support for this approach. Time-series cross-sectional and panel data allow the analysis to exploit exogenous shifts in salient national issues such as the September 11 attacks, reducing the problem of residential self-selection and other threats to validity. The article also tests the hypothesis using new data on local anti-immigrant policies. By highlighting the interaction of local and national conditions, the politicized places hypothesis can explain both individual attitudes and local political outcomes.
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              Liminal Legality: Salvadoran and Guatemalan Immigrants' Lives in the United States

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Annual Review of Sociology
                Annu. Rev. Sociol.
                Annual Reviews
                0360-0572
                1545-2115
                August 11 2011
                August 11 2011
                : 37
                : 1
                : 529-543
                Article
                10.1146/annurev-soc-081309-150216
                bf46cd45-188a-44e8-98e9-b85c464b14d1
                © 2011
                History

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