0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Assessment of In Vitro Bioaccessibility and In Vivo Oral Bioavailability as Complementary Tools to Better Understand the Effect of Cooking on Methylmercury, Arsenic, and Selenium in Tuna

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Fish consumption is the main exposure pathway of the neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHg) in humans. The risk associated with exposure to MeHg may be modified by its interactions with selenium (Se) and arsenic (As). In vitro bioaccessibility studies have demonstrated that cooking the fish muscle decreases MeHg solubility markedly and, as a consequence, its potential absorption by the consumer. However, this phenomenon has yet to be validated by in vivo models. Our study aimed to test whether MeHg bioaccessibility can be used as a surrogate to assess the effect of cooking on MeHg in vivo availability. We fed pigs raw and cooked tuna meals and collected blood samples from catheters in the portal vein and carotid artery at: 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300, 360, 420, 480 and 540 min post-meal. In contrast to in vitro models, pig oral bioavailability of MeHg was not affected by cooking, although the MeHg kinetics of absorption was faster for the cooked meal than for the raw meal. We conclude that bioaccessibility should not be readily used as a direct surrogate for in vivo studies and that, in contrast with the in vitro results, the cooking of fish muscle did not decrease the exposure of the consumer to MeHg.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 101

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Amino acid transport across mammalian intestinal and renal epithelia.

           Stefan Bröer (2007)
          The transport of amino acids in kidney and intestine is critical for the supply of amino acids to all tissues and the homeostasis of plasma amino acid levels. This is illustrated by a number of inherited disorders affecting amino acid transport in epithelial cells, such as cystinuria, lysinuric protein intolerance, Hartnup disorder, iminoglycinuria, dicarboxylic aminoaciduria, and some other less well-described disturbances of amino acid transport. The identification of most epithelial amino acid transporters over the past 15 years allows the definition of these disorders at the molecular level and provides a clear picture of the functional cooperation between transporters in the apical and basolateral membranes of mammalian epithelial cells. Transport of amino acids across the apical membrane not only makes use of sodium-dependent symporters, but also uses the proton-motive force and the gradient of other amino acids to efficiently absorb amino acids from the lumen. In the basolateral membrane, antiporters cooperate with facilitators to release amino acids without depleting cells of valuable nutrients. With very few exceptions, individual amino acids are transported by more than one transporter, providing backup capacity for absorption in the case of mutational inactivation of a transport system.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Oxidation of free amino acids and amino acid residues in proteins by radiolysis and by metal-catalyzed reactions.

             E Stadtman (1992)
            Basic mechanisms that underlie the oxygen free radical-promoted oxidation of free amino acids and amino acid residues of proteins are derived from radiolysis studies. Results of these studies indicate that the most common pathway for the oxidation of simple aliphatic amino acids involves the hydroxyl radical-mediated abstraction of a hydrogen atom to form a carbon-centered radical at the alpha-position of the amino acid or amino acid residue in the polypeptide chain. Addition of O2 to the carbon-centered radicals leads to formation of peroxy radical derivatives, which upon decomposition lead to production of NH3 and alpha-ketoacids, or to production of NH3, CO2, and aldehydes or carboxylic acids containing one less carbon atom. As the number of carbon atoms in the amino acid is increased, hydrogen abstraction at other positions in the carbon chain becomes more important and leads either to the formation of hydroxy derivatives, or to amino acid cross-linked products as a consequence of carbon-centered radical recombination processes. alpha-Hydrogen abstraction plays a minor role in the oxidation of aromatic amino acids by radiolysis. Instead, the aromatic ring is the primary site of attack leading to hydroxy derivatives, to ring scission, and in the case of tyrosine to the formation of Tyr-Tyr cross-linked dimers. The basic pattern for the oxidation of amino acids by metal ion-catalyzed reactions (Fenton chemistry) is similar to the alpha-hydrogen abstraction pathway. But unlike the case of oxidation by radiolysis, this Fenton pathway is the major mechanism for the oxidation of all aliphatic amino acids, regardless of chain length, as well as for the oxidation of aromatic amino acids. Curiously, the Fe(III)-catalyzed oxidation of free amino acids is almost completely dependent upon the presence of bicarbonate ion, and is greatly stimulated by iron chelators at chelator/Fe(III) ratios less than 1.0, and is inhibited at chelator/Fe(III) ratios greater than 1.0. It is deduced that the most active catalytic complex is composed of two equivalents of HCO3-, an amino acid, and at least one equivalent of iron; however, two forms of iron, an iron-chelate and another form, must somehow be involved. In contrast to the situation with radiolysis, the aromatic rings of aromatic amino acids are only minor targets for metal-catalyzed reactions. All amino acid residues in proteins are subject to attack by hydroxyl radicals generated by ionizing radiation; however, the aromatic amino acids and sulfur-containing amino acids are most sensitive to oxidation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Decreased proteolysis caused by protein aggregates, inclusion bodies, plaques, lipofuscin, ceroid, and 'aggresomes' during oxidative stress, aging, and disease.

              Protein aggregation seems to be a common feature of several neurodegenerative diseases and to some extent of physiological aging. It is not always clear why protein aggregation takes place, but a disturbance in the homeostasis between protein synthesis and protein degradation seems to be important. The result is the accumulation of modified proteins, which tend to form high molecular weight aggregates. Such aggregates are also called inclusion bodies, plaques, lipofuscin, ceroid, or 'aggresomes' depending on their location and composition. Such aggregates are not inert metabolic end products, but actively influence the metabolism of cells, in particular proteasomal activity and protein turnover. In this review we focus on the influence of oxidative stress on protein turnover, protein aggregate formation and the various interactions of protein aggregates with the proteasome. Furthermore, the formation and effects of protein aggregates during aging and neurodegeneration will be highlighted.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Toxics
                Toxics
                toxics
                Toxics
                MDPI
                2305-6304
                03 February 2021
                February 2021
                : 9
                : 2
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Groupe de Recherche Interuniversitaire en Limnologie (GRIL), Département de Sciences Biologiques, Université de Montréal, Complexe des Sciences, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada; tania.charette@ 123456umontreal.ca
                [2 ]Sherbrooke Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Sherbrooke, QC J1M 0C8, Canada; danyel.buenodalto@ 123456canada.ca (D.B.D.); jacques.matte2@ 123456canada.ca (J.J.M.)
                [3 ]Groupe de Recherche Interuniversitaire en Limnologie et en Environnement Aquatique (GRIL), Département des Sciences Biologiques, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), 141 Avenue du Président-Kennedy, Montréal, QC H2X 1Y4, Canada; rosabal.maikel@ 123456uqam.ca
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: m.amyot@ 123456umontreal.ca
                Article
                toxics-09-00027
                10.3390/toxics9020027
                7913187
                33546146
                © 2021 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article