Blog
About

2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Natural variation in the HAN1 gene confers chilling tolerance in rice and allowed adaptation to a temperate climate

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Rice ( Oryza sativa L.) is a chilling-sensitive staple crop that originated in subtropical regions of Asia. Introduction of the chilling tolerance trait enables the expansion of rice cultivation to temperate regions. Here we report the cloning and characterization of HAN1, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) that confers chilling tolerance on temperate japonica rice. HAN1 encodes an oxidase that catalyzes the conversion of biologically active jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile) to the inactive form 12-hydroxy-JA-Ile (12OH-JA-Ile) and fine-tunes the JA-mediated chilling response. Natural variants in HAN1 diverged between indica and japonica rice during domestication. A specific allele from temperate japonica rice, which gained a putative MYB cis-element in the promoter of HAN1 during the divergence of the two japonica ecotypes, enhances the chilling tolerance of temperate japonica rice and allows it to adapt to a temperate climate. The results of this study extend our understanding of the northward expansion of rice cultivation and provide a target gene for the improvement of chilling tolerance in rice.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 39

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          JAZ repressor proteins are targets of the SCF(COI1) complex during jasmonate signalling.

          Jasmonate and related signalling compounds have a crucial role in both host immunity and development in plants, but the molecular details of the signalling mechanism are poorly understood. Here we identify members of the jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) protein family as key regulators of jasmonate signalling. JAZ1 protein acts to repress transcription of jasmonate-responsive genes. Jasmonate treatment causes JAZ1 degradation and this degradation is dependent on activities of the SCF(COI1) ubiquitin ligase and the 26S proteasome. Furthermore, the jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) conjugate, but not other jasmonate-derivatives such as jasmonate, 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, or methyl-jasmonate, promotes physical interaction between COI1 and JAZ1 proteins in the absence of other plant proteins. Our results suggest a model in which jasmonate ligands promote the binding of the SCF(COI1) ubiquitin ligase to and subsequent degradation of the JAZ1 repressor protein, and implicate the SCF(COI1)-JAZ1 protein complex as a site of perception of the plant hormone JA-Ile.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The JAZ family of repressors is the missing link in jasmonate signalling.

            Jasmonates are essential phytohormones for plant development and survival. However, the molecular details of their signalling pathway remain largely unknown. The identification more than a decade ago of COI1 as an F-box protein suggested the existence of a repressor of jasmonate responses that is targeted by the SCF(COI1) complex for proteasome degradation in response to jasmonate. Here we report the identification of JASMONATE-INSENSITIVE 3 (JAI3) and a family of related proteins named JAZ (jasmonate ZIM-domain), in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results demonstrate that JAI3 and other JAZs are direct targets of the SCF(COI1) E3 ubiquitin ligase and jasmonate treatment induces their proteasome degradation. Moreover, JAI3 negatively regulates the key transcriptional activator of jasmonate responses, MYC2. The JAZ family therefore represents the molecular link between the two previously known steps in the jasmonate pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate the existence of a regulatory feed-back loop involving MYC2 and JAZ proteins, which provides a mechanistic explanation for the pulsed response to jasmonate and the subsequent desensitization of the cell.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found
              Is Open Access

              A map of rice genome variation reveals the origin of cultivated rice.

              Crop domestications are long-term selection experiments that have greatly advanced human civilization. The domestication of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) ranks as one of the most important developments in history. However, its origins and domestication processes are controversial and have long been debated. Here we generate genome sequences from 446 geographically diverse accessions of the wild rice species Oryza rufipogon, the immediate ancestral progenitor of cultivated rice, and from 1,083 cultivated indica and japonica varieties to construct a comprehensive map of rice genome variation. In the search for signatures of selection, we identify 55 selective sweeps that have occurred during domestication. In-depth analyses of the domestication sweeps and genome-wide patterns reveal that Oryza sativa japonica rice was first domesticated from a specific population of O. rufipogon around the middle area of the Pearl River in southern China, and that Oryza sativa indica rice was subsequently developed from crosses between japonica rice and local wild rice as the initial cultivars spread into South East and South Asia. The domestication-associated traits are analysed through high-resolution genetic mapping. This study provides an important resource for rice breeding and an effective genomics approach for crop domestication research.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                Proc Natl Acad Sci USA
                Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
                0027-8424
                1091-6490
                February 26 2019
                February 26 2019
                February 26 2019
                February 11 2019
                : 116
                : 9
                : 3494-3501
                Article
                10.1073/pnas.1819769116
                © 2019

                Free to read

                http://www.pnas.org/site/misc/userlicense.xhtml

                Comments

                Comment on this article