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Medical simulation-based education improves medicos' clinical skills

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      Abstract

      Clinical skill is an essential part of clinical medicine and plays quite an important role in bridging medicos and physicians. Due to the realities in China, traditional medical education is facing many challenges. There are few opportunities for students to practice their clinical skills and their dexterities are generally at a low level. Medical simulation-based education is a new teaching modality and helps to improve medicos' clinical skills to a large degree. Medical simulation-based education has many significant advantages and will be further developed and applied.

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      Simulation technology for health care professional skills training and assessment.

      Changes in medical practice that limit instruction time and patient availability, the expanding options for diagnosis and management, and advances in technology are contributing to greater use of simulation technology in medical education. Four areas of high-technology simulations currently being used are laparoscopic techniques, which provide surgeons with an opportunity to enhance their motor skills without risk to patients; a cardiovascular disease simulator, which can be used to simulate cardiac conditions; multimedia computer systems, which includes patient-centered, case-based programs that constitute a generalist curriculum in cardiology; and anesthesia simulators, which have controlled responses that vary according to numerous possible scenarios. Some benefits of simulation technology include improvements in certain surgical technical skills, in cardiovascular examination skills, and in acquisition and retention of knowledge compared with traditional lectures. These systems help to address the problem of poor skills training and proficiency and may provide a method for physicians to become self-directed lifelong learners.
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        See one, do one, teach one: advanced technology in medical education.

        The concept of "learning by doing" has become less acceptable, particularly when invasive procedures and high-risk care are required. Restrictions on medical educators have prompted them to seek alternative methods to teach medical knowledge and gain procedural experience. Fortunately, the last decade has seen an explosion of the number of tools available to enhance medical education: web-based education, virtual reality, and high fidelity patient simulation. This paper presents some of the consensus statements in regard to these tools agreed upon by members of the Educational Technology Section of the 2004 AEM Consensus Conference for Informatics and Technology in Emergency Department Health Care, held in Orlando, Florida. Web-based teaching: 1) Every ED should have access to medical educational materials via the Internet, computer-based training, and other effective education methods for point-of-service information, continuing medical education, and training. 2) Real-time automated tools should be integrated into Emergency Department Information Systems [EDIS] for contemporaneous education. Virtual reality [VR]: 1) Emergency physicians and emergency medicine societies should become more involved in VR development and assessment. 2) Nationally accepted protocols for the proper assessment of VR applications should be adopted and large multi-center groups should be formed to perform these studies. High-fidelity simulation: Emergency medicine residency programs should consider the use of high-fidelity patient simulators to enhance the teaching and evaluation of core competencies among trainees. Across specialties, patient simulation, virtual reality, and the Web will soon enable medical students and residents to... see one, simulate many, do one competently, and teach everyone.
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          Assessing competency in Evidence Based Practice: strengths and limitations of current tools in practice

           Dragan Ilic (2009)
          Background Evidence Based Practice (EBP) involves making clinical decisions informed by the most relevant and valid evidence available. Competence can broadly be defined as a concept that incorporates a variety of domains including knowledge, skills and attitudes. Adopting an evidence-based approach to practice requires differing competencies across various domains including literature searching, critical appraisal and communication. This paper examines the current tools available to assess EBP competence and compares their applicability to existing assessment techniques used in medicine, nursing and health sciences. Discussion Only two validated assessment tools have been developed to specifically assess all aspects of EBP competence. Of the two tools (Berlin and Fresno tools), only the Fresno tool comprehensively assesses EBP competency across all relevant domains. However, both tools focus on assessing EBP competency in medical students; therefore neither can be used for assessing EBP competency across different health disciplines. The Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) has been demonstrated as a reliable and versatile tool to assess clinical competencies, practical and communication skills. The OSCE has scope as an alternate method for assessing EBP competency, since it combines assessment of cognitive skills including knowledge, reasoning and communication. However, further research is needed to develop the OSCE as a viable method for assessing EBP competency. Summary Demonstrating EBP competence is a complex task – therefore no single assessment method can adequately provide all of the necessary data to assess complete EBP competence. There is a need for further research to explore how EBP competence is best assessed; be it in written formats, such as the Fresno tool, or another format, such as the OSCE. Future tools must also incorporate measures of assessing how EBP competence affects clinician behaviour and attitudes as well as clinical outcomes in real-time situations. This research should also be conducted across a variety of health disciplines to best inform practice.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [a ]Department of Surgery, The First School of Clinical Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210000, China;
            [b ]Department of General Surgery, Anhui Province Hospital, Hefei, Anhui 230001, China
            Author notes
            []Corresponding author: Hai Wang, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Surgery, the First School of Clinical Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, 300 Guangzhou Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210000, China. Tel: +86-13951776992, E-mail: wangherry@ 123456hotmail.com .

            The authors reported no conflict of interests.

            Journal
            J Biomed Res
            J Biomed Res
            JBR
            Journal of Biomedical Research
            Editorial Department of Journal of Biomedical Research
            1674-8301
            March 2013
            24 December 2012
            : 27
            : 2
            : 81-84
            23554799 3602866 jbr-27-02-081 10.7555/JBR.27.20120131
            © 2013 by the Journal of Biomedical Research. All rights reserved.

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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