Blog
About

25
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Clinical and Echocardiographic Predictors of Arrhythmias Detected With 24-Hour Holter Electrocardiography Among Hypertensive Heart Failure Patients in Nigeria

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background:

          Hypertensive heart failure (HHF) is the commonest form of heart failure in Nigeria. There is paucity of data in Nigeria on 24-hour Holter electrocardiography (24-HHECG) and important predictors of arrhythmias among HHF patients.

          Objectives:

          To determine the 24-HHECG characteristics among HHF patients. To determine the clinical and echocardiographic predictors of arrhythmias detected using 24-HHECG among HHF patients.

          Methods:

          A total of 100 HHF patients as well as 50 age-matched and sex-matched apparently healthy controls were prospectively recruited over a period of 1 year. They all had baseline laboratory tests, echocardiography, and 24-HHECG.

          Results:

          Hypertensive heart failure patients had significantly higher counts of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) than the controls ( P ≤ .001). Ventricular tachycardia (VT) was recorded in 29% of HHF patients as compared with controls who had no VT on 24-HHECG. The standard deviation of all normal to normal sinus RR intervals over 24 hours (SDNN) was abnormally reduced among HHF patients when compared with controls ( P = .046). There was positive correlation between atrial fibrillation (AF) and the following parameters: PVCs ( r = .229, P = .015), New York Heart Association (NYHA) ( r = .196, P = .033), and VT ( r = .223, P = .018). Following multiple linear regression, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ( P ≤ .001) and serum urea ( P = .037) were predictors of PVCs among HHF patients. Serum creatinine ( P ≤ .001), elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) ( P = .005), and PVCs ( P ≤ .001) were important predictors of VT among HHF patients.

          Conclusions:

          Renal dysfunction and reduced LVEF were important predictors of ventricular arrhythmias. High counts of PVCs and elevated SBP were predictive of the occurrence of VT among HHF patients. The NYHA class and ventricular arrhythmias have a significant positive correlation with AF. The SDNN is reduced in HHF patients.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 44

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Outcome of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction in a population-based study.

          The importance of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is increasingly recognized. We conducted a study to evaluate the epidemiologic features and outcomes of patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction and to compare the findings with those from patients who had heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. From April 1, 1999, through March 31, 2001, we studied 2802 patients admitted to 103 hospitals in the province of Ontario, Canada, with a discharge diagnosis of heart failure whose ejection fraction had also been assessed. The patients were categorized in three groups: those with an ejection fraction of less than 40 percent (heart failure with reduced ejection fraction), those with an ejection fraction of 40 to 50 percent (heart failure with borderline ejection fraction), and those with an ejection fraction of more than 50 percent (heart failure with preserved ejection fraction). Two groups were studied in detail: those with an ejection fraction of less than 40 percent and those with an ejection fraction of more than 50 percent. The main outcome measures were death within one year and readmission to the hospital for heart failure. Thirty-one percent of the patients had an ejection fraction of more than 50 percent. Patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction were more likely to be older and female and to have a history of hypertension and atrial fibrillation. The presenting history and clinical examination findings were similar for the two groups. The unadjusted mortality rates for patients with an ejection fraction of more than 50 percent were not significantly different from those for patients with an ejection fraction of less than 40 percent at 30 days (5 percent vs. 7 percent, P=0.08) and at 1 year (22 percent vs. 26 percent, P=0.07); the adjusted one-year mortality rates were also not significantly different in the two groups (hazard ratio, 1.13; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.94 to 1.36; P=0.18). The rates of readmission for heart failure and of in-hospital complications did not differ between the two groups. Among patients presenting with new-onset heart failure, a substantial proportion had an ejection fraction of more than 50 percent. The survival of patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction was similar to that of patients with reduced ejection fraction. Copyright 2006 Massachusetts Medical Society.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            2016 ACC/AHA/HFSA Focused Update on New Pharmacological Therapy for Heart Failure: An Update of the 2013 ACCF/AHA Guideline for the Management of Heart Failure: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Heart Failure Society of America.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Atrial fibrillation and heart failure: treatment considerations for a dual epidemic.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clin Med Insights Cardiol
                Clin Med Insights Cardiol
                CIC
                spcic
                Clinical Medicine Insights. Cardiology
                SAGE Publications (Sage UK: London, England )
                1179-5468
                10 December 2017
                2017
                : 11
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Medicine, Metropolitan Hospital Center, New York, NY, USA
                [2 ]Cardiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria
                [3 ]Faculty of Dentistry, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife, Nigeria
                Author notes
                Tuoyo O Mene-Afejuku, Department of Medicine, Metropolitan Hospital Center, 1901 First Avenue, New York, NY 10029, USA. Email: tuoyoleads2000@ 123456yahoo.co.uk
                Article
                10.1177_1179546817746632 CIC-0042285
                10.1177/1179546817746632
                5731613
                © The Author(s) 2017

                This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License ( http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages ( https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).

                Categories
                Original Research
                Custom metadata
                January-December 2017

                Comments

                Comment on this article