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      Phylogenetic characterization and morphological and physiological aspects of a novel acidotolerant and halotolerant microalga Coccomyxa onubensis sp. nov. (Chlorophyta, Trebouxiophyceae)

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          Chlorophyll fluorescence—a practical guide

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            The genome of the polar eukaryotic microalga Coccomyxa subellipsoidea reveals traits of cold adaptation

            Background Little is known about the mechanisms of adaptation of life to the extreme environmental conditions encountered in polar regions. Here we present the genome sequence of a unicellular green alga from the division chlorophyta, Coccomyxa subellipsoidea C-169, which we will hereafter refer to as C-169. This is the first eukaryotic microorganism from a polar environment to have its genome sequenced. Results The 48.8 Mb genome contained in 20 chromosomes exhibits significant synteny conservation with the chromosomes of its relatives Chlorella variabilis and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The order of the genes is highly reshuffled within synteny blocks, suggesting that intra-chromosomal rearrangements were more prevalent than inter-chromosomal rearrangements. Remarkably, Zepp retrotransposons occur in clusters of nested elements with strictly one cluster per chromosome probably residing at the centromere. Several protein families overrepresented in C. subellipsoidae include proteins involved in lipid metabolism, transporters, cellulose synthases and short alcohol dehydrogenases. Conversely, C-169 lacks proteins that exist in all other sequenced chlorophytes, including components of the glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol anchoring system, pyruvate phosphate dikinase and the photosystem 1 reaction center subunit N (PsaN). Conclusions We suggest that some of these gene losses and gains could have contributed to adaptation to low temperatures. Comparison of these genomic features with the adaptive strategies of psychrophilic microbes suggests that prokaryotes and eukaryotes followed comparable evolutionary routes to adapt to cold environments.
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              Effect of salt concentration on intracellular accumulation of lipids and triacylglyceride in marine microalgae Dunaliella cells.

              In order to get the high liquefaction yield from marine algae cell mass to fuel oil, the effect of salt stress on the accumulation of lipids and triacylglyceride in Dunaliella cells was investigated. Although initial NaCl concentration higher than 1.5 M markedly inhibited cell growth, increase of initial NaCl concentration from 0.5 (equal to sea water) to 1.0 M resulted in a higher intracellular lipid content (67%) in comparison with 60% for the salt concentration of 0.5 M. Addition of 0.5 or 1.0 M NaCl at mid-log phase or the end of log phase during cultivation with initial NaCl concentration of 1.0 M further increased the lipid content (70%).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Applied Phycology
                J Appl Phycol
                Springer Nature America, Inc
                0921-8971
                1573-5176
                December 2016
                June 21 2016
                December 2016
                : 28
                : 6
                : 3269-3279
                10.1007/s10811-016-0887-3
                © 2016

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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