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      A global perspective on child sexual abuse: meta-analysis of prevalence around the world.

      Child maltreatment

      Adolescent, Age Factors, Bias (Epidemiology), Child, Child Abuse, Sexual, statistics & numerical data, Child, Preschool, Cross-Cultural Comparison, Cross-Sectional Studies, Data Collection, Female, Humans, Incidence, Infant, Male, Sample Size, Self Disclosure, Sex Factors

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          Abstract

          Our comprehensive meta-analysis combined prevalence figures of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) reported in 217 publications published between 1980 and 2008, including 331 independent samples with a total of 9,911,748 participants. The overall estimated CSA prevalence was 127/1000 in self-report studies and 4/1000 in informant studies. Self-reported CSA was more common among female (180/1000) than among male participants (76/1000). Lowest rates for both girls (113/1000) and boys (41/1000) were found in Asia, and highest rates were found for girls in Australia (215/1000) and for boys in Africa (193/1000). The results of our meta-analysis confirm that CSA is a global problem of considerable extent, but also show that methodological issues drastically influence the self-reported prevalence of CSA.

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          Adverse childhood experiences and the risk of depressive disorders in adulthood.

          Research examining the association between childhood abuse and depressive disorders has frequently assessed abuse categorically, thus not permitting discernment of the cumulative impact of multiple types of abuse. As previous research has documented that adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are highly interrelated, we examined the association between the number of such experiences (ACE score) and the risk of depressive disorders. Retrospective cohort study of 9460 adult health maintenance organization members in a primary care clinic in San Diego, CA who completed a survey addressing a variety of health-related concerns, which included standardized assessments of lifetime and recent depressive disorders, childhood abuse and household dysfunction. Lifetime prevalence of depressive disorders was 23%. Childhood emotional abuse increased risk for lifetime depressive disorders, with adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of 2.7 [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.3-3.2] in women and 2.5 (95% CI, 1.9-3.2) in men. We found a strong, dose-response relationship between the ACE score and the probability of lifetime and recent depressive disorders (P<0.0001). This relationship was attenuated slightly when a history of growing up with a mentally ill household member was included in the model, but remained significant (P<0.001). The number of ACEs has a graded relationship to both lifetime and recent depressive disorders. These results suggest that exposure to ACEs is associated with increased risk of depressive disorders up to decades after their occurrence. Early recognition of childhood abuse and appropriate intervention may thus play an important role in the prevention of depressive disorders throughout the life span.
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            Worldwide prevalence and genotype distribution of cervical human papillomavirus DNA in women with normal cytology: a meta-analysis.

            We set out to estimate the age and genotype-specific prevalence of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in women with normal cervical cytology worldwide by meta-analysis of a systematic literature review. Reports on HPV prevalence published between January, 1995, and January, 2005, were retrieved. To be included, studies required information on cervical cytology, plus detailed descriptions of study populations, methods used to collect cervical samples, and assays used for HPV DNA detection and typing. Final analyses included 78 studies that could be separated into women with normal cytology, and of which subsets of 44 and 48 studies had data on age and type-specific HPV prevalence, respectively. Overall HPV prevalence in 157 879 women with normal cervical cytology was estimated to be 10.4% (95% CI 10.2-10.7). Corresponding estimates by region were Africa 22.1% (20.9-23.4), Central America and Mexico 20.4% (19.3-21.4), northern America 11.3% (10.6-12.1), Europe 8.1% (7.8-8.4), and Asia 8.0% (7.5-8.4). In all world regions, HPV prevalence was highest in women younger than 35 years of age, decreasing in women of older age. In Africa, the Americas, and Europe, a clear second peak of HPV prevalence was observed in women aged 45 years or older. On the basis of these estimates, around 291 million women worldwide are carriers of HPV DNA, of whom 32% are infected with HPV16 or HPV18, or both. The HPV types most commonly detected are similar to those most commonly described in pre-neoplastic and cancer cases, although the relative contribution of HPV16 and HPV18 is substantially lower in cytologically normal women.
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              Impact of sexual abuse on children: A review and synthesis of recent empirical studies.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                21511741
                10.1177/1077559511403920

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