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      Reducing the trigger dose of recombinant hCG in high-responder patients attending an assisted reproductive technology program: an observational study

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          Abstract

          Decreasing the dose of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) used to trigger final oocyte maturation in assisted reproductive technology programs is regarded as a useful intervention in the prevention of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, but the minimal effective dose has not been yet identified. In this study, the capacity of a reduced dose of recombinant hCG (r-hCG) to provide adequate oocyte maturation was tested for the first time. Thirty-five high-responder patients received a dose of 125 µg (half of the standard dose) of r-hCG for triggering final oocyte maturation. The number of oocytes retrieved per patient and the proportion of mature oocytes were evaluated. As a result, a mean number of 14 oocytes were retrieved, of which 85% were found to be mature (MII). There was only one patient developing a moderate form of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and not requiring hospitalization. It is suggested that r-hCG at 125 µg can be effective in triggering final oocyte maturation in high-responder patients. Additional properly powered and controlled studies are needed to support this contention.

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          Most cited references 15

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          Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in novel reproductive technologies: prevention and treatment.

           N Laufer,  D Navot,  P Bergh (1992)
          To overview the world literature on ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) and modes of prevention and treatment of OHSS. All the pertinent literature on OHSS, its prevention, and strategies for treatment were reviewed. Key to prevention is proper identification of the population at risk, which includes women with either the hormonal or the morphological signs of polycystic ovarian disease, high serum estradiol (E2) before human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration (E2 greater than 4,000 pg/mL), multiple follicular response (greater than 35), younger age, and lean habitus. When a high risk situation is recognized, ovulatory dose of hCG may be reduced, avoided (with cycle cancellation), or substituted by gonadotropin-releasing hormone or its agonist. Luteal support with hCG is to be bypassed. To minimize risk of OHSS, endogenous pregnancy-drived hCG may be eluded by judicious cryopreservation of all embryos. Last, follicular aspiration will allow higher levels of E2 and larger number of follicles to be matured with lesser risk of OHSS than conventional ovulation induction without follicular aspiration. In-house for the severe and intensive care for the critical form. Meticulous fluid and electrolyte balance using both crystalloids and colloids (albumin) until hemoconcentration abates. Paracentesis is indicated for tight ascites, deteriorating kidney functions, and symptomatic relief. Diuretics may be prudently used once hemodilution is achieved. Dopamine drip may be used as a renal rescue, whereas heparin is indicated for thromboembolic phenomena and surgery reserved for abdominal catastrophies. Therapeutic interruption of an early gestation may be lifesaving when all other measures have failed. Although severe and critical OHSS may not be completely avoided, early recognition of high-risk factors, judicious prevention schemes, and treatment strategies should reduce the complication and long-term sequelae of this iatrogenic syndrome.
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            Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: an update review.

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              Preventing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: guidance for the clinician.

              To reevaluate ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) prevention techniques and provide a classification system for grading OHSS and evidence-based treatment strategies for preventing OHSS. A literature search was conducted in PubMed for articles published in the last 5 years using the keywords "controlled ovarian stimulation," "controlled ovarian hyperstimulation," "ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome," "OHSS," "prevention," "chorionic gonadotropin," "hCG," "GnRH agonist," "GnRH antagonist," "coasting," and "cryopreservation." We reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs), retrospective studies, pilot studies, case studies, reviews, and meta-analyses. There is a shortage of large, prospective RCTs reporting OHSS prediction and prevention strategies. Our review showed that risk factors such as antral follicle count and baseline anti-Müllerian hormone level may identify women at high OHSS risk. Preventative strategies that appear highly effective at reducing or preventing OHSS include GnRH antagonist protocols and the use of GnRH agonists to trigger final oocyte maturation. Moreover, alternative therapies, such as dopamine receptor agonists (Cabergoline), have also emerged as potential new treatment modalities in the management of this disease. These findings suggest that current treatment guidelines should be updated to incorporate findings from recent literature that show that GnRH antagonist protocols consistently reduce OHSS and that GnRH agonist triggering has considerable promise in preventing OHSS, although further RCTs will be needed to confirm this. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2016
                18 May 2016
                : 10
                : 1691-1694
                Affiliations
                Department of Medicine and Aging Sciences, University “G d’Annunzio” of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Gian Mario Tiboni, Department of Medicine and Aging Sciences, University “G d’Annunzio” of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini, 66013 Chieti, Italy, Tel +39 085 917 2390, Email tiboni@ 123456unich.it
                Article
                dddt-10-1691
                10.2147/DDDT.S105607
                4876795
                27274202
                © 2016 Tiboni et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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                Original Research

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