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      Circulating chromogranin A and catecholamines in human fetuses at uneventful birth.

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          Abstract

          Chromogranin A (CGA), a large acidic 48-kD protein, costored and coreleased by exocytosis with catecholamines, has been shown to be a precursor of peptides that exert feedback regulatory control on catecholamine secretion. In plasma, CGA levels increase in response to a large-amplitude physical stimulation in adult subjects and may be related to catecholamine levels. Any skin information is not yet available when the sympathoadrenal system is highly active during birth. This activation is strongly related to parturition circumstances such as the mode of delivery. The aim of our study was to determine CGA plasma levels in infants delivered vaginally or by elective cesarean section and to investigate the possible correlation between CGA and catecholamine concentrations. Plasma levels of catecholamines (norepinephrine and epinephrine) and CGA were assessed by HPLC with electrochemical detection and immunoenzymology, respectively. CGA and norepinephrine concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.0002 and p < 0.02) in infants vaginally born than in the group delivered by elective cesarean section. A significant relationship (p < 0.04) was found between CGA and norepinephrine levels. However, for epinephrine, no significant difference was found between both groups. These results demonstrate the fetus' ability to corelease CGA and norepinephrine massively in response to stress of birth.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Pediatr. Res.
          Pediatric research
          Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
          0031-3998
          0031-3998
          Jan 1995
          : 37
          : 1
          Affiliations
          [1 ] INSERM (Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale) U272 Pathologie et Biologie du Développement Humain, Nancy, France.
          Article
          10.1203/00006450-199501000-00019
          7700724
          c1159a39-3104-4432-816c-82dbadd365dc

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