Blog
About

13
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Role of arformoterol in the management of COPD

      International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

      Dove Medical Press

      COPD, arformoterol, efficacy, safety

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Formoterol is a beta2-agonist that has both short and long acting bronchodilator effects. Beta2-agonists used as bronchodilators have been synthesized as racemates that comprise (R,R) and (S,S)-enantiomers. Compounds that are beta2-selective derive their bronchodilator effect from an interaction between the (R,R)-enantiomer and the beta2-adrenoceptor. Arformoterol is the (R,R)-enantiomer and is distinguished from the more commonly used racemic (RR/S,S)-diasteriomer of formoterol. Overall literature on the use of arformoterol in COPD is very preliminary. There is some in vitro data that demonstrate significant bronchodilation and inhibition of inflammation with arformoterol, and these effects may be more pronounced than those caused by racemic formoterol. There are limited clinical trial data that demonstrate that arformoterol produces significant improvement in lung function in COPD; however, many of the subjects involved had marked baseline airway reversibility. Arformoterol has been very well tolerated in clinical trials and could potentially be used only once every 24 hours (due to its prolonged effect). It can only be given in nebulized form. Arformoterol can potentially be given with other inhaled medications.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 67

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Global strategy for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: GOLD executive summary.

          Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains a major public health problem. It is the fourth leading cause of chronic morbidity and mortality in the United States, and is projected to rank fifth in 2020 in burden of disease worldwide, according to a study published by the World Bank/World Health Organization. Yet, COPD remains relatively unknown or ignored by the public as well as public health and government officials. In 1998, in an effort to bring more attention to COPD, its management, and its prevention, a committed group of scientists encouraged the U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the World Health Organization to form the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Among the important objectives of GOLD are to increase awareness of COPD and to help the millions of people who suffer from this disease and die prematurely of it or its complications. The first step in the GOLD program was to prepare a consensus report, Global Strategy for the Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of COPD, published in 2001. The present, newly revised document follows the same format as the original consensus report, but has been updated to reflect the many publications on COPD that have appeared. GOLD national leaders, a network of international experts, have initiated investigations of the causes and prevalence of COPD in their countries, and developed innovative approaches for the dissemination and implementation of COPD management guidelines. We appreciate the enormous amount of work the GOLD national leaders have done on behalf of their patients with COPD. Despite the achievements in the 5 years since the GOLD report was originally published, considerable additional work is ahead of us if we are to control this major public health problem. The GOLD initiative will continue to bring COPD to the attention of governments, public health officials, health care workers, and the general public, but a concerted effort by all involved in health care will be necessary.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Salmeterol and fluticasone propionate and survival in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

            Long-acting beta-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids are used to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but their effect on survival is unknown. We conducted a randomized, double-blind trial comparing salmeterol at a dose of 50 microg plus fluticasone propionate at a dose of 500 microg twice daily (combination regimen), administered with a single inhaler, with placebo, salmeterol alone, or fluticasone propionate alone for a period of 3 years. The primary outcome was death from any cause for the comparison between the combination regimen and placebo; the frequency of exacerbations, health status, and spirometric values were also assessed. Of 6112 patients in the efficacy population, 875 died within 3 years after the start of the study treatment. All-cause mortality rates were 12.6% in the combination-therapy group, 15.2% in the placebo group, 13.5% in the salmeterol group, and 16.0% in the fluticasone group. The hazard ratio for death in the combination-therapy group, as compared with the placebo group, was 0.825 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.681 to 1.002; P=0.052, adjusted for the interim analyses), corresponding to a difference of 2.6 percentage points or a reduction in the risk of death of 17.5%. The mortality rate for salmeterol alone or fluticasone propionate alone did not differ significantly from that for placebo. As compared with placebo, the combination regimen reduced the annual rate of exacerbations from 1.13 to 0.85 and improved health status and spirometric values (P<0.001 for all comparisons with placebo). There was no difference in the incidence of ocular or bone side effects. The probability of having pneumonia reported as an adverse event was higher among patients receiving medications containing fluticasone propionate (19.6% in the combination-therapy group and 18.3% in the fluticasone group) than in the placebo group (12.3%, P<0.001 for comparisons between these treatments and placebo). The reduction in death from all causes among patients with COPD in the combination-therapy group did not reach the predetermined level of statistical significance. There were significant benefits in all other outcomes among these patients. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00268216 [ClinicalTrials.gov].). Copyright 2007 Massachusetts Medical Society.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

               Chris Barnes (2000)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                September 2008
                September 2008
                : 3
                : 3
                : 385-392
                Affiliations
                Monash University Department of Medicine and Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Monash Medical Centre, Australia
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Paul King, Department of Medicine, Monash, Medical Centre, 246 Clayton Rd, Clayton, Melbourne, Victoria, 3168, Australia, Tel +61 3 9594 6666, Fax +61 3 9549 6495, Email paul.king@ 123456med.monash.edu.au
                Article
                copd-3-385
                2629977
                18990965
                © 2008 Dove Medical Press Limited. All rights reserved
                Categories
                Reviews

                Respiratory medicine

                copd, safety, arformoterol, efficacy

                Comments

                Comment on this article