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      Two new species of the genus Anillinus Casey (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Anillini) from the southern United States

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          Abstract

          Two new species of blind ground beetles are described from the southern United States. One species, Anillinus relictus sp. nov. (type locality: E of Oneonta, Blount County, Alabama), based on the structure of male genitalia, is similar to Texan Anillinus, in particular to the endogean A. sinuatus Jeannel. The second species, A. felicianus sp. nov. (type locality: 4 mi SW Jackson, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana), is superficially similar to the endogean A. sinuaticollis Jeannel from Roane County, Tennessee, and represents the first record of the genus for the state of Louisiana. All species are illustrated with digital images of habitus, body parts, and male and female genitalia. Biogeographical and evolutionary implications of the new findings are discussed.

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          Most cited references 24

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          Catalogue of Geadephaga (Coleoptera, Adephaga) of America, north of Mexico

           Yves Bousquet (2012)
          Abstract All scientific names of Trachypachidae, Rhysodidae, and Carabidae (including cicindelines) recorded from America north of Mexico are catalogued. Available species-group names are listed in their original combinations with the author(s), year of publication, page citation, type locality, location of the name-bearing type, and etymology for many patronymic names. In addition, the reference in which a given species-group name is first synonymized is recorded for invalid taxa. Genus-group names are listed with the author(s), year of publication, page citation, type species with way of fixation, and etymology for most. The reference in which a given genus-group name is first synonymized is recorded for many invalid taxa. Family-group names are listed with the author(s), year of publication, page citation, and type genus. The geographical distribution of all species-group taxa is briefly summarized and their state and province records are indicated. One new genus-group taxon, Randallius new subgenus (type species: Chlaenius purpuricollis Randall, 1838), one new replacement name, Pterostichus amadeus new name for Pterostichus vexatus Bousquet, 1985, and three changes in precedence, Ellipsoptera rubicunda (Harris, 1911) for Ellipsoptera marutha (Dow, 1911), Badister micans LeConte, 1844 for Badister ocularis Casey, 1920, and Agonum deplanatum Ménétriés, 1843 for Agonum fallianum (Leng, 1919), are proposed. Five new genus-group synonymies and 65 new species-group synonymies, one new species-group status, and 12 new combinations (see Appendix 5) are established. The work also includes a discussion of the notable private North American carabid collections, a synopsis of all extant world geadephagan tribes and subfamilies, a brief faunistic assessment of the fauna, a list of valid species-group taxa, a list of North American fossil Geadephaga (Appendix 1), a list of North American Geadephaga larvae described or illustrated (Appendix 2), a list of Geadephaga species described from specimens mislabeled as from North America (Appendix 3), a list of unavailable Geadephaga names listed from North America (Appendix 4), a list of nomenclatural acts included in this catalogue (Appendix 5), a complete bibliography with indication of the dates of publication in addition to the year, and indices of personal names, supraspecific names, and species-group names.
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            Caroli Linnaei...Systema naturae per regna tria naturae :secundum classes, ordines, genera, species, cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis.

             Carl Linné (1758)
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              Phylogeographic concordance in the southeastern United States: the flatwoods salamander, Ambystoma cingulatum, as a test case.

              Well-supported, congruent phylogeographic and biogeographic patterns permit the development of a priori phylogeographic and distributional predictions. In the southeastern Coastal Plain of the United States, the common discovery of east-west disjunctions (phylogeographic breaks and species' distributional boundaries) suggests that similar disjunctions should occur in codistributed taxa. Despite the near ubiquity of these disjunctions, the most recent morphological analyses of the flatwoods salamander, Ambystoma cingulatum, indicate that none occur in this low-vagility, Coastal Plain endemic. We conducted molecular and morphological analyses to test whether the flatwoods salamander is an exception to this common biogeographic pattern. Assessing geographic variation in this species is also an important management tool for this threatened, declining amphibian. We demonstrate that flatwoods salamanders, as predicted by comparisons to codistributed taxa, are polytypic with a major disjunction at the Apalachicola River. This drainage is a common site for east-west phylogeographic breaks, probably because repeated marine embayments during the Pliocene and Pleistocene interglacials generated barriers to gene flow. Based on mitochondrial DNA, morphology, and allozymes, we recognize two species of flatwoods salamanders -- Ambystoma cingulatum to the east of the Apalachicola drainage and Ambystoma bishopi to the west. Given this increased diversity, the conservation status of these two taxa may warrant re-evaluation. More generally, these results emphasize that in the absence of taxon-specific data, established comparative patterns can provide strong expectations for designing management units for unstudied species of conservation concern.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                ZooKeys
                ZK
                Pensoft Publishers
                1313-2970
                1313-2989
                February 11 2021
                February 11 2021
                : 1016
                : 63-76
                Article
                10.3897/zookeys.1016.61397
                7892533
                33628079
                © 2021

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