Blog
About

21
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Guideline for the Prevention of Falls in Older Persons

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 70

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          A multifactorial intervention to reduce the risk of falling among elderly people living in the community.

          Since falling is associated with serious morbidity among elderly people, we investigated whether the risk of falling could be reduced by modifying known risk factors. We studied 301 men and women living in the community who were at least 70 years of age and who had at least one of the following risk factors for falling: postural hypotension; use of sedatives; use of at least four prescription medications; and impairment in arm or leg strength or range of motion, balance, ability to move safely from bed to chair or to the bathtub or toilet (transfer skills), or gait. These subjects were given either a combination of adjustment in their medications, behavioral instructions, and exercise programs aimed at modifying their risk factors (intervention group, 153 subjects) or usual health care plus social visits (control group, 148 subjects). During one year of follow-up, 35 percent of the intervention group fell, as compared with 47 percent of the control group (P = 0.04). The adjusted incidence-rate ratio for falling in the intervention group as compared with the control group was 0.69 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.52 to 0.90). Among the subjects who had a particular risk factor at base line, a smaller percentage of those in the intervention group than of those in the control group still had the risk factor at the time of reassessment, as follows: at least four prescription medications, 63 percent versus 86 percent, P = 0.009; balance impairment, 21 percent versus 46 percent, P = 0.001; impairment in toilet-transfer skills, 49 percent versus 65 percent, P = 0.05; and gait impairment, 45 percent versus 62 percent, P = 0.07. The multiple-risk-factor intervention strategy resulted in a significant reduction in the risk of falling among elderly persons in the community. In addition, the proportion of persons who had the targeted risk factors for falling was reduced in the intervention group, as compared with the control group. Thus, risk-factor modification may partially explain the reduction in the risk of falling.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Risk factors for falls in a community-based prospective study of people 70 years and older.

            We investigated factors associated with falls in a community-based prospective study of 761 subjects 70 years and older. The group experienced 507 falls during the year of monitoring. On entry to the study a number of variables had been assessed in each subject. Variables associated with an increased risk of falling differed in men and women. In men, decreased levels of physical activity, stroke, arthritis of the knees, impairment of gait, and increased body sway were associated with an increased risk of falls. In women, the total number of drugs, psychotropic drugs and drugs liable to cause postural hypotension, standing systolic blood pressure of less than 110 mmHg, and evidence of muscle weakness were also associated with an increased risk of falling. Most falls in elderly people are associated with multiple risk factors, many of which are potentially remediable. The possible implications of this in diagnosis and prevention are discussed.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Prevention of falls in the elderly trial (PROFET): a randomised controlled trial.

              Falls in elderly people are a common presenting complaint to accident and emergency departments. Current practice commonly focuses on the injury, with little systematic assessment of the underlying cause, functional consequences, and possibilities for future prevention. We undertook a randomised controlled study to assess the benefit of a structured inderdisciplinary assessment of people who have fallen in terms of further falls. Eligible patients were aged 65 years and older, lived in the community, and presented to an accident and emergency department with a fall. Patients assigned to the intervention group (n=184) underwent a detailed medical and occupational-therapy assessment with referral to relevant services if indicated; those assigned to the control group (n=213) received usual care only. The analyses were by intention to treat. Follow-up data were collected every 4 months for 1 year. At 12-month follow-up, 77% of both groups remained in the study. The total reported number of falls during this period was 183 in the intervention group compared with 510 in the control group (p=0.0002). The risk of falling was significantly reduced in the intervention group (odds ratio 0.39 [95% CI 0.23-0.66]) as was the risk of recurrent falls (0.33 [0.16-0.68]). In addition, the odds of admission to hospital were lower in the intervention group (0.61 [0.35-1.05]) whereas the decline in Barthel score with time was greater in the control group (p<0.00001). The study shows that an interdisciplinary approach to this high-risk population can significantly decrease the risk of further falls and limit functional impairment.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
                Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
                Wiley
                00028614
                15325415
                May 2001
                May 2001
                : 49
                : 5
                : 664-672
                Article
                10.1046/j.1532-5415.2001.49115.x
                11380764
                © 2001

                Comments

                Comment on this article