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      Shopping for Clothes: From Meeting Individual Needs to Socializing

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      Proceedings of the 31st International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2017) (HCI)

      digital make-believe, with delegates considering our expansive

      3 - 6 July 2017

      Clothes, shopping, cognition, activity theory, Human-Computer Interaction

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          Abstract

          In this paper, we analyze how shopping for clothes continues to be a social phenomenon, despite technological advances. Using a grounded theory approach, we coded 16 semi-structured interviews to develop process models of online and in-store shopping and to identify the constraints of each method. We then analyzed apparel shopping from the lens of Engeström’s model of Activity Theory to compare online and in-store shopping at a conceptual level. We offer design recommendations for building systems and processes that bridge the gap between online and offline shopping.

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          Constructing Grounded Theory

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            Activity theory as a framework for analyzing and redesigning work.

             Y Engeström (2000)
            Cultural-historical activity theory is a new framework aimed at transcending the dichotomies of micro- and macro-, mental and material, observation and intervention in analysis and redesign of work. The approach distinguishes between short-lived goal-directed actions and durable, object-oriented activity systems. A historically evolving collective activity system, seen in its network relations to other activity systems, is taken as the prime unit of analysis against which scripted strings of goal-directed actions and automatic operations are interpreted. Activity systems are driven by communal motives that are often difficult to articulate for individual participants. Activity systems are in constant movement and internally contradictory. Their systemic contradictions, manifested in disturbances and mundane innovations, offer possibilities for expansive developmental transformations. Such transformations proceed through stepwise cycles of expansive learning which begin with actions of questioning the existing standard practice, then proceed to actions of analyzing its contradictions and modelling a vision for its zone of proximal development, then to actions of examining and implementing the new model in practice. New forms of work organization increasingly require negotiated 'knotworking' across boundaries. Correspondingly, expansive learning increasingly involves horizontal widening of collective expertise by means of debating, negotiating and hybridizing different perspectives and conceptualizations. Findings from a longitudinal intervention study of children's medical care illuminate the theoretical arguments.
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              What drives consumers to shop online? A literature review

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2017
                July 2017
                : 1-7
                Affiliations
                Clemson University School of Computing

                215 McAdams Hall, Clemson SC 29634
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2017.78
                © Sinha et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2017 – Digital Make-Believe. Sunderland, UK.

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 31st International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2017)
                HCI
                31
                Sunderland, UK
                3 - 6 July 2017
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                digital make-believe, with delegates considering our expansive
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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