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      Annual Research Review: Interparental conflict and youth psychopathology: an evidence review and practice focused update

      1 , 1
      Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
      Wiley

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          Measuring Marital Quality: A Critical Look at the Dependent Variable

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            Assessing marital conflict from the child's perspective: the children's perception of interparental conflict scale.

            Guided by Grych and Fincham's theoretical framework for investigating the relation between interparental conflict and child adjustment, a questionnaire was developed to assess children's views of several aspects of marital conflict. The Children's Perception of Interparental Conflict Scale (CPIC) was initially examined in a sample of 222 9-12-year-old children, and results were cross-validated in a second sample of 144 similarly aged children. 3 factor analytically derived subscales (Conflict Properties, Threat, Self-Blame) demonstrated acceptable levels of internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The validity of the Conflict Properties scale was supported by significant relations with parent reports of conflict and indices of child adjustment; the Threat and Self-Blame scales correlated with children's responses to specific conflict vignettes. The CPIC thus appears to be a promising instrument for assessing perceived marital conflict, and several issues regarding its interpretation are discussed.
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              The new look of behavioral genetics in developmental psychopathology: gene-environment interplay in antisocial behaviors.

              This article reviews behavioral-genetic research to show how it can help address questions of causation in developmental psychopathology. The article focuses on studies of antisocial behavior, because these have been leading the way in investigating environmental as well as genetic influences on psychopathology. First, the article illustrates how behavioral-genetic methods are being newly applied to detect the best candidates for genuine environmental causes among the many risk factors for antisocial behavior. Second, the article examines findings of interaction between genes and environments (G x E) associated with antisocial behavior, outlining steps for testing hypotheses of measured G x E. Third, the article envisages future work on gene-environment interplay, arguing that it is an interesting and profitable way forward for psychopathology research. Copyright 2005 APA, all rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
                J Child Psychol Psychiatr
                Wiley
                00219630
                April 2018
                April 2018
                March 25 2018
                : 59
                : 4
                : 374-402
                Affiliations
                [1 ]University of Sussex; Brighton UK
                Article
                10.1111/jcpp.12893
                29574737
                c290c62c-b0a0-4d3b-8c45-0327789efec3
                © 2018

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

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