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      Haptoglobin, hemopexin, and related defense pathways—basic science, clinical perspectives, and drug development

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          Abstract

          Hemolysis, which occurs in many disease states, can trigger a diverse pathophysiologic cascade that is related to the specific biochemical activities of free Hb and its porphyrin component heme. Normal erythropoiesis and concomitant removal of senescent red blood cells (RBC) from the circulation occurs at rates of approximately 2 × 10 6 RBCs/second. Within this physiologic range of RBC turnover, a small fraction of hemoglobin (Hb) is released into plasma as free extracellular Hb. In humans, there is an efficient multicomponent system of Hb sequestration, oxidative neutralization and clearance. Haptoglobin (Hp) is the primary Hb-binding protein in human plasma, which attenuates the adverse biochemical and physiologic effects of extracellular Hb. The cellular receptor target of Hp is the monocyte/macrophage scavenger receptor, CD163. Following Hb-Hp binding to CD163, cellular internalization of the complex leads to globin and heme metabolism, which is followed by adaptive changes in antioxidant and iron metabolism pathways and macrophage phenotype polarization. When Hb is released from RBCs within the physiologic range of Hp, the potential deleterious effects of Hb are prevented. However, during hyper-hemolytic conditions or with chronic hemolysis, Hp is depleted and Hb readily distributes to tissues where it might be exposed to oxidative conditions. In such conditions, heme can be released from ferric Hb. The free heme can then accelerate tissue damage by promoting peroxidative reactions and activation of inflammatory cascades. Hemopexin (Hx) is another plasma glycoprotein able to bind heme with high affinity. Hx sequesters heme in an inert, non-toxic form and transports it to the liver for catabolism and excretion. In the present review we discuss the components of physiologic Hb/heme detoxification and their potential therapeutic application in a wide range of hemolytic conditions.

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          A tissue-scale gradient of hydrogen peroxide mediates rapid wound detection in zebrafish

          Barrier structures (e.g. epithelia around tissues, plasma membranes around cells) are required for internal homeostasis and protection from pathogens. Wound detection and healing represent a dormant morphogenetic program that can be rapidly executed to restore barrier integrity and tissue homeostasis. In animals, initial steps include recruitment of leukocytes to the site of injury across distances of hundreds of micrometers within minutes of wounding. The spatial signals that direct this immediate tissue response are unknown. Due to their fast diffusion and versatile biological activities, reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), are interesting candidates for wound-to-leukocyte signalling. We probed the role of H2O2 during the early events of wound responses in zebrafish larvae expressing a genetically encoded H2O2 sensor1. This reporter revealed a sustained rise in H2O2 concentration at the wound margin, starting ∼3 min after wounding and peaking at ∼20 min, which extended ∼100−200 μm into the tail fin epithelium as a decreasing concentration gradient. Using pharmacological and genetic inhibition, we show that this gradient is created by Dual oxidase (Duox), and that it is required for rapid recruitment of leukocytes to the wound. This is the first observation of a tissue-scale H2O2 pattern, and the first evidence that H2O2 signals to leukocytes in tissues, in addition to its known antiseptic role.
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            The clinical sequelae of intravascular hemolysis and extracellular plasma hemoglobin: a novel mechanism of human disease.

            The efficient sequestration of hemoglobin by the red blood cell membrane and the presence of multiple hemoglobin clearance mechanisms suggest a critical need to prevent the buildup of this molecule in the plasma. A growing list of clinical manifestations attributed to hemoglobin release in a variety of acquired and iatrogenic hemolytic disorders suggests that hemolysis and hemoglobinemia should be considered as a novel mechanism of human disease. Pertinent scientific literature databases and references were searched through October 2004 using terms that encompassed various aspects of hemolysis, hemoglobin preparations, clinical symptoms associated with plasma hemoglobin, nitric oxide in hemolysis, anemia, pulmonary hypertension, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and sickle-cell disease. Hemoglobin is released into the plasma from the erythrocyte during intravascular hemolysis in hereditary, acquired, and iatrogenic hemolytic conditions. When the capacity of protective hemoglobin-scavenging mechanisms has been saturated, levels of cell-free hemoglobin increase in the plasma, resulting in the consumption of nitric oxide and clinical sequelae. Nitric oxide plays a major role in vascular homeostasis and has been shown to be a critical regulator of basal and stress-mediated smooth muscle relaxation and vasomotor tone, endothelial adhesion molecule expression, and platelet activation and aggregation. Thus, clinical consequences of excessive cell-free plasma hemoglobin levels during intravascular hemolysis or the administration of hemoglobin preparations include dystonias involving the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and urogenital systems, as well as clotting disorders. Many of the clinical sequelae of intravascular hemolysis in a prototypic hemolytic disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, are readily explained by hemoglobin-mediated nitric oxide scavenging. A growing body of evidence supports the existence of a novel mechanism of human disease, namely, hemolysis-associated smooth muscle dystonia, vasculopathy, and endothelial dysfunction.
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              Pulmonary hypertension as a risk factor for death in patients with sickle cell disease.

              The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in adults with sickle cell disease, the mechanism of its development, and its prospective prognostic significance are unknown. We performed Doppler echocardiographic assessments of pulmonary-artery systolic pressure in 195 consecutive patients (82 men and 113 women; mean [+/-SD] age, 36+/-12 years). Pulmonary hypertension was prospectively defined as a tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity of at least 2.5 m per second. Patients were followed for a mean of 18 months, and data were censored at the time of death or loss to follow-up. Doppler-defined pulmonary hypertension occurred in 32 percent of patients. Multiple logistic-regression analysis, with the use of the dichotomous variable of a tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity of less than 2.5 m per second or 2.5 m per second or more, identified a self-reported history of cardiovascular or renal complications, increased systolic blood pressure, high lactate dehydrogenase levels (a marker of hemolysis), high levels of alkaline phosphatase, and low transferrin levels as significant independent correlates of pulmonary hypertension. The fetal hemoglobin level, white-cell count, and platelet count and the use of hydroxyurea therapy were unrelated to pulmonary hypertension. A tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity of at least 2.5 m per second, as compared with a velocity of less than 2.5 m per second, was strongly associated with an increased risk of death (rate ratio, 10.1; 95 percent confidence interval, 2.2 to 47.0; P<0.001) and remained so after adjustment for other possible risk factors in a proportional-hazards regression model. Pulmonary hypertension, diagnosed by Doppler echocardiography, is common in adults with sickle cell disease. It appears to be a complication of chronic hemolysis, is resistant to hydroxyurea therapy, and confers a high risk of death. Therapeutic trials targeting this population of patients are indicated. Copyright 2004 Massachusetts Medical Society
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Front Physiol
                Front Physiol
                Front. Physiol.
                Frontiers in Physiology
                Frontiers Media S.A.
                1664-042X
                28 October 2014
                2014
                : 5
                Affiliations
                1Division of Internal Medicine, University of Zurich Zurich, Switzerland
                2Department of Molecular Biotechnology and Health Sciences, University of Torino Torino, Italy
                3Division of Hematology, Laboratory of Biochemistry and Vascular Biology, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration Bethesda, MD, USA
                Author notes

                Edited by: Magnus Gram, Lund University, Sweden

                Reviewed by: Sruti Shiva, University of Pittsburgh, USA; Jeak Ling Ding, National University of Singapore, Singapore; Joseph M. Rifkind, National Institute on Aging, USA; Soren Kragh Moestrup, Aarhus University, Denmark

                *Correspondence: Dominik J. Schaer, Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital, Ramistrasse 100, Zurich CH-8091, Switzerland e-mail: dominik.schaer@ 123456usz.ch

                This article was submitted to Oxidant Physiology, a section of the journal Frontiers in Physiology.

                †The findings and conclusions in this article have not been formally disseminated by the Food and Drug Administration and should not be construed to represent any Agency determination or policy.

                Article
                10.3389/fphys.2014.00415
                4211382
                Copyright © 2014 Schaer, Vinchi, Ingoglia, Tolosano and Buehler.

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

                Page count
                Figures: 3, Tables: 0, Equations: 3, References: 119, Pages: 13, Words: 10946
                Categories
                Physiology
                Review Article

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