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      Microhabitat segregation among three co-existing species of grasshoppers on a rural meadow near Seoul, South Korea

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      Journal of Orthoptera Research

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          Microhabitat segregation among grasshopper species in Asia has not been well studied. We determined the differences in the use of substrates by three common North East Asian grasshopper species co-existing on a natural meadow near Seoul, South Korea. While many Oedaleusinfernalis individuals were found on the ground, Acridacinerea and Atractomorphalata were usually observed on plants. Acridacinerea was mostly observed on the grass Zoysiajaponica (Poaceae) and Atractomorphalata was mostly found on plants from the family Asteraceae. This is the first study to provide quantitative information about microhabitat differences among some common grasshoppers in rural habitats of continental North East Asia. Future studies should focus on determining the mechanisms that produce such ecological segregation.

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          Most cited references 19

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          Differential Habitat Selection by Pygmy Grasshopper Color Morphs; Interactive Effects of Temperature and Predator Avoidance

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            Density-dependent aposematism in the desert locust.

            The ecological processes underlying locust swarm formation are poorly understood. Locust species exhibit phenotypic plasticity in numerous morphological, physiological and behavioural traits as their population density increases. These density-dependent changes are commonly assumed to be adaptations for migration under heterogeneous environmental conditions. Here we demonstrate that density-dependent nymphal colour change in the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria (Orthoptera: Acrididae) results in warning coloration (aposematism) when the population density increases and locusts consume native, toxic host plants. Fringe-toed lizards (Acanthodactylus dumerili (Lacertidae)) developed aversions to high-density-reared (gregarious-phase) locusts fed Hyoscyamus muticus (Solanaceae). Lizards associated both olfactory and visual cues with locust unpalatability, but only gregarious-phase coloration was an effective visual warning signal. The lizards did not associate low rearing density coloration (solitarious phase) with locust toxicity. Predator learning of density-dependent warning coloration results in a marked decrease in predation on locusts and may directly contribute to outbreaks of this notorious pest.
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              Does microclimate affect grasshopper populations after cutting of hay in improved grassland?

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Orthoptera Research
                JOR
                Pensoft Publishers
                1937-2426
                1082-6467
                December 05 2018
                December 05 2018
                : 27
                : 2
                : 173-175
                Article
                10.3897/jor.27.28402
                © 2018

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