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      Gene silencing in mammals by small interfering RNAs.

      Nature reviews. Genetics

      Animals, Gene Silencing, physiology, Gene Targeting, Humans, MicroRNAs, Molecular Sequence Data, Nucleic Acid Conformation, Plants, RNA, Messenger, RNA, Small Interfering, Virus Diseases, therapy

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          Abstract

          Among the 3 billion base pairs of the human genome, there are approximately 30,000-40,000 protein-coding genes, but the function of at least half of them remains unknown. A new tool - short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) - has now been developed for systematically deciphering the functions and interactions of these thousands of genes. siRNAs are an intermediate of RNA interference, the process by which double-stranded RNA silences homologous genes. Although the use of siRNAs to silence genes in vertebrate cells was only reported a year ago, the emerging literature indicates that most vertebrate genes can be studied with this technology.

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          Journal
          12360232
          10.1038/nrg908

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