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      Genetic Tailors: CTCF and Cohesin Shape the Genome During Evolution.

      1 , 2
      Trends in genetics : TIG

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          Abstract

          Research into chromosome structure and organization is an old field that has seen some fascinating progress in recent years. Modern molecular methods that can describe the shape of chromosomes have begun to revolutionize our understanding of genome organization and the mechanisms that regulate gene activity. A picture is beginning to emerge of chromatin loops representing a widespread organizing principle of the chromatin fiber and the proteins cohesin and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) as key players anchoring such chromatin loops. Here we review our current understanding of the features of CTCF- and cohesin-mediated genome organization and how their evolution may have helped to shape genome structure.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Trends Genet.
          Trends in genetics : TIG
          0168-9525
          0168-9525
          Nov 2015
          : 31
          : 11
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Research Department of Cancer Biology, Cancer Institute, University College London, 72 Huntley Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.
          [2 ] Research Department of Cancer Biology, Cancer Institute, University College London, 72 Huntley Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK. Electronic address: s.hadjur@ucl.ac.uk.
          Article
          S0168-9525(15)00164-X
          10.1016/j.tig.2015.09.004
          26439501
          c36bd37d-ed1d-4097-b8b1-c8ae6be8b629
          Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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