5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Associations among Sleep Quality, Changes in Eating Habits, and Overweight or Obesity after Studying Abroad among International Students in South Korea

      * ,

      Nutrients

      MDPI

      eating habits, international students, overweight or obesity, sleep quality

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          International students are experiencing health problems due to many lifestyle changes, such as those in dietary and sleep patterns. We conducted this study to identify the associations among sleep patterns, changes in eating habits after studying abroad, and overweight or obesity in international students. In this cross-sectional study, we analyzed data on health-related variables, changes in eating habits after studying abroad, and sleep patterns that were collected from 225 international students in South Korea. Approximately half of the participants experienced poor sleep (47.6%). After adjusting for covariates such as age, gender, nationality, and acculturative stress, the subjects who had poor sleep quality were 2.020-fold (adjusted odds ratio, 95% confidence interval = 1.045–3.906) more likely to be overweight and obese than those who had good sleep quality. There were significant differences in changes of eating habits after studying abroad according to sleep quality ( p < 0.001). When subjects were stratified into groups according to changes in eating habits after studying abroad, the risk of overweight and obesity increased in those with poor sleep quality but not in those with good sleep quality among subjects who had changes in bad eating habits. However, the risk of overweight and obesity did not differ among subjects with changes in good eating habits regardless of their sleep quality.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 20

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Relationships between the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and clinical/polysomnographic measures in a community sample.

          1) To characterize PSQI and ESS scores, and their relationship to each other, in an adult community sample; 2) To determine whether PSQI and ESS scores, in combination with each other, were associated with distinct demographic, clinical, and sleep characteristics. The PSQI, ESS, clinical rating scales, sleep diaries, actigraphy, and home polysomnography were collected from 187 community-dwelling adults (mean age 59.5 years, 47.1% women, 41.2% African Americans) as part of a study investigating novel cardiovascular risk factors. Correlations, cluster analysis, principal components analysis, MANOVA, ANOVA, and regressions were used to characterize the relationships between the PSQI, ESS, and other study variables Mean PSQI score was 6.3 (3.4), and mean ESS score was 8.2 (3.9). PSQI and ESS correlated weakly with each other (r = 0.16, p = 0.03), but segregated from each other on principal components analysis. Groups of participants categorized by either cluster analysis of PSQI and ESS scores, or by scores above or below traditional cut-off values, differed from each other on psychological/stress symptoms and quantitative and qualitative sleep diary measures, but not on actigraphic or polysomnographic measures. Specifically, higher PSQI scores were associated with female sex, greater psychological distress, and greater sleep disturbance on sleep diaries. The PSQI and ESS measure orthogonal dimensions of sleep-wake symptoms, but neither is related to objective sleep measures. The PSQI is more closely related to psychological symptom ratings and sleep diary measures than the ESS. These instruments are not likely to be useful as screening measures for polysomnographic sleep abnormalities.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Criterion validity of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index: Investigation in a non-clinical sample.

            The objective of this study was to investigate the reliability and validity of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in a non-clinical sample consisting of younger and older adults. There has been little research validating the PSQI with respect to multinight recording as with actigraphy, and more validation is needed in samples not specifically selected for clinical disturbance. Also, the degree to which the PSQI scores may reflect depressive symptoms versus actual sleep disturbance remains unclear. One-hundred and twelve volunteers (53 younger and 59 older) were screened for their ability to perform treadmill exercises; inclusion was not based on sleep disturbance or depression. Internal homogeneity was evaluated by correlating PSQI component scores with the global score. Global and component scores were correlated with a sleep diary, actigraphy, and centers for epidemiological studies - depression scale scores to investigate criterion validity. Results showed high internal homogeneity. PSQI global score correlated appreciably with sleep diary variables and the depression scale, but not with any actigraphic sleep variables. These results suggest that the PSQI has good internal homogeneity, but may be less reflective of actual sleep parameters than a negative cognitive viewpoint or pessimistic thinking. The sleep complaints measured may often be more indicative of general dissatisfaction than of any specifically sleep-related disturbance.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Development of an Acculturative Stress Scale for International Students: preliminary findings.

              Description of the development and testing of a new 36-item scale in Likert format, designed to assess the acculturative stress of international students, includes perceived discrimination, homesickness, fear, guilt, perceived hatred, and stress due to change (cultural shock), identified as major contributing factors. The psychometric properties of this instrument and implications for use by mental health practitioners are discussed.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nutrients
                Nutrients
                nutrients
                Nutrients
                MDPI
                2072-6643
                07 July 2020
                July 2020
                : 12
                : 7
                Affiliations
                Department of Food and nutrition, Kunsan National University, Daehak-ro 558, Gunsan 54150, Korea; yangyangyang0302@ 123456gmail.com
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: miae_doo@ 123456kunsan.ac.kr ; Tel.: +82-63-469-4631; Fax: +82-63-469-2085
                Article
                nutrients-12-02020
                10.3390/nu12072020
                7400796
                32645989
                © 2020 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Article

                Nutrition & Dietetics

                eating habits, international students, overweight or obesity, sleep quality

                Comments

                Comment on this article