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      Effect of certolizumab pegol on signs and symptoms in patients with psoriatic arthritis: 24-week results of a Phase 3 double-blind randomised placebo-controlled study (RAPID-PsA)

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          Abstract

          Objectives

          To evaluate the efficacy and safety of certolizumab pegol (CZP) after 24 weeks in RAPID-PsA (NCT01087788), an ongoing Phase 3 trial in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA).

          Methods

          Patients were randomised 1:1:1 to placebo, 200 mg CZP every 2 weeks (Q2W) or 400 mg CZP every 4 weeks (Q4W). Patients could have had exposure to one previous tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy. Primary endpoints were American College of Rheumatology 20% (ACR20) response at week 12 and modified Total Sharp Score change from baseline at week 24. Secondary endpoints included; Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC) score, Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Psoriasis Area and Severity Index, Leeds Enthesitis Index, Leeds Dactylitis Index, and Modified Nail Psoriasis Severity Index.

          Results

          Of 409 patients randomised, 368 completed 24 weeks of treatment. ACR20 response was significantly greater in CZP 200 mg Q2W and 400 mg Q4W-treated patients than placebo (58.0% and 51.9% vs 24.3% (p<0.001)) at week 12, with improvements observed by week 1. There was a statistically significant improvement in physical function from baseline, measured by HAQ-DI in CZP patients compared with placebo (−0.50 vs −0.19, p<0.001) and more patients treated with CZP 200 mg Q2W and CZP 400 mg achieved an improvement in PsARC at week 24 than placebo (78.3% and 77.0% vs 33.1% (p<0.001)). Sustained improvements were observed in psoriatic skin involvement, enthesitis, dactylitis and nail disease. Higher ACR20 response with CZP was independent of prior TNF inhibitor exposure. No new safety signals were observed.

          Conclusions

          Rapid improvements in the signs and symptoms of PsA, including joints, skin, enthesitis, dactylitis and nail disease were observed across both CZP dosing regimens.

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          Most cited references18

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          Measurement of patient outcome in arthritis.

          A structure for representation of patient outcome is presented, together with a method for outcome measurement and validation of the technique in rheumatoid arthritis. The paradigm represents outcome by five separate dimensions: death, discomfort, disability, drug (therapeutic) toxicity, and dollar cost. Each dimension represents an outcome directly related to patient welfare. Quantitation of these outcome dimensions may be performed at interview or by patient questionnaire. With standardized, validated questions, similar scores are achieved by both methods. The questionnaire technique is preferred since it is inexpensive and does not require interobserver validation. These techniques appear extremely useful for evaluation of long term outcome of patients with rheumatic diseases.
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            American College of Rheumatology. Preliminary definition of improvement in rheumatoid arthritis.

            Trials of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treatments report the average response in multiple outcome measures for treated patients. It is more clinically relevant to test whether individual patients improve with treatment, and this identifies a single primary efficacy measure. Multiple definitions of improvement are currently in use in different trials. The goal of this study was to promulgate a single definition for use in RA trials. Using the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set of outcome measures for RA trials, we tested 40 different definitions of improvement, using a 3-step process. First, we performed a survey of rheumatologists, using actual patient cases from trials, to evaluate which definitions corresponded best to rheumatologists' impressions of improvement, eliminating most candidate definitions of improvement. Second, we tested 20 remaining definitions to determine which maximally discriminated effective treatment from placebo treatment and also minimized placebo response rates. With 8 candidate definitions of improvement remaining, we tested to see which were easiest to use and were best in accord with rheumatologists' impressions of improvement. The following definition of improvement was selected: 20% improvement in tender and swollen joint counts and 20% improvement in 3 of the 5 remaining ACR core set measures: patient and physician global assessments, pain, disability, and an acute-phase reactant. Additional validation of this definition was carried out in a comparative trial, and the results suggest that the definition is statistically powerful and does not identify a large percentage of placebo-treated patients as being improved. We present a definition of improvement which we hope will be used widely in RA trials.
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              Severe psoriasis--oral therapy with a new retinoid.

              Ro 10-9359 is a retinoic acid derivative, selected for study because of a better tolerance than retinoic acid, shown in animal experiments. Doses of 25 mg b.i.d., 25 mg t.i.d. and 50 mg b.i.d. were administered orally to 27 patients suffering from severe chronic generalized psoriasis. The clinical efficacy was evaluated by means of a new index, psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) based on severity and area of psoriatic lesions. At doses of 25 mg t.i.d. or 50 mg b.i.d. Ro 10--9359 proved to be an extremely potent antipsoriatic drug. A more than 90% reduction of psoriatic lesions could be seen in 10 patients out of 20 after 4-8 weeks of treatment. This good effect lasted about 5 weeks after treatment. Side effects were frequent, but mostly mild and completely reversible after termination of treatment.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ann Rheum Dis
                Ann. Rheum. Dis
                annrheumdis
                ard
                Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
                BMJ Publishing Group (BMA House, Tavistock Square, London, WC1H 9JR )
                0003-4967
                1468-2060
                January 2014
                13 August 2013
                : 73
                : 1
                : 48-55
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington , Seattle, Washington, USA
                [2 ]University of Texas SW Medical Center , Dallas, Texas, USA
                [3 ]Div Arthritis/Rheumatic Diseases (OPO9), Oregon Health & Science University , Portland, Oregon, USA
                [4 ]Klinik für Rheumatologie und klinische Immunologie, Schoen Klinik , Hamburg, Germany
                [5 ]Memorial University of Newfoundland, Nexus Clinical Research , St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
                [6 ]UCB Pharma , Brussels, Belgium
                [7 ]UCB Pharma , Monheim am Rhein, Germany
                [8 ]UCB Pharma , Raleigh, North Carolina, USA
                [9 ]Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre , Leiden, The Netherlands
                Author notes

                Handling editor Tore K Kvien

                [Correspondence to ] Professor Philip J Mease, Seattle Rheumatology Associates, 601 Broadway, Suite 600, Seattle, WA, 98122, USA; pmease@ 123456philipmease.com
                Article
                annrheumdis-2013-203696
                10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-203696
                3888622
                23942868
                c40afe11-a434-4ad5-b845-482d6a853741
                Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions

                This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

                History
                : 27 March 2013
                : 12 June 2013
                : 26 June 2013
                Categories
                1506
                Clinical and Epidemiological Research
                Extended report
                Custom metadata
                unlocked

                Immunology
                treatment,anti-tnf,psoriatic arthritis
                Immunology
                treatment, anti-tnf, psoriatic arthritis

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