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      Araneophagic jumping spiders discriminate between the draglines of familiar and unfamiliar conspecifics

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      Ethology Ecology & Evolution

      Informa UK Limited

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          Most cited references 6

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          Individual Odors among Mammals: Origins and Functions

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            Identification of a sex pheromone from a spider.

             S. Toft,  S. Schulz (1993)
            The compounds (R)-3-hydroxybutyric acid and its dimer, (R)-3-[(R)-3-hydroxybutyryloxy]-butyric acid, have been identified as sex pheromones of a spider. These compounds elicit web reduction behavior by males of Linyphia triangularis (Clerck) on the webs of unmated adult females.
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              Individual odor differences and their social functions in insects.

              The evolution of individual or subgroup differences in odors of halictine bees is suggested from possible widespread intraspecific variation in pheromones. An important result of such variation may be maintenance of genetic polymorphisms; in nesting Hymenoptera odor differences may also facilitate individual nest recognition. In Lasioglosum zephyrum males habituate to odors of different females and perhaps thus save time by not trying to copulate with nonreceptive individuals. Guards (females) at nest entrances distinguish their few nestmates (other females) from other conspecific individuals by odors, seemingly pheromones. Duration of the habituation in L. zephyrum is at least an hour (perhaps much more) for males in relation to females and 6 or 7 days for guards in relation to nestmates. Studies of pheromones should take into consideration the possibility of pheromonal polymorphism in any species and the likelihood that it may be significant from biological and practical viewpoints.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ethology Ecology & Evolution
                Ethology Ecology & Evolution
                Informa UK Limited
                0394-9370
                1828-7131
                April 1995
                April 1995
                : 7
                : 2
                : 185-190
                Article
                10.1080/08927014.1995.9522964
                © 1995

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