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      The value of transperineal apical prostate biopsy in predicting urethral/apical margin status after radical prostatectomy

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          Abstract

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          Abstract

          Purpose:

          To investigate potential preoperative predictors of urethral or apical positive surgical margin (PSM) and the value of apical prostate biopsy in predicting urethral/apical margin status after radical prostatectomy (RP).

          Methods:

          A total of 531 patients who underwent RP during 2010 to 2017 at West China Hospital were enrolled in this retrospective study. Preoperative and postoperative factors including age, BMI, PSA, clinical T stage and biopsy Gleason score were analyzed. Univariate analysis and logistic regression were used to find out the potential predictive factors for PSM. Two logistic regression models were built to evaluate the role of apical prostate biopsy in predicting urethral/apical margin status.

          Results:

          The overall PSM rate was about 30.1% (160/531) and 97 of them were reported urethral/apical PSM. The incidence of urethral or apical PSM in patients with positive cores in the apical prostate was higher than those without (23.0% vs 9.9%, P < .001). We further found that the multivariable model with positive apical prostate biopsy could significantly increase the predictive value of urethral or apical PSM status (AUC: 0.744 vs 0.783, P = .016). Our analysis also showed that neo-adjuvant hormone therapy was an independent protective factor for urethral or apical PSM in patients with positive apical prostate biopsy, but not all patients.

          Conclusion:

          This study revealed the necessity of apical prostate biopsy to predict the risk of apical or urethral PSM. In clinical practice, neo-adjuvant hormone therapy should be given when patients with positive apical prostate biopsy to reduce the presence of PSM, especially patients with high/very high risk prostate cancer.

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          Most cited references 31

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          Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: AUA/ASTRO/SUO Guideline. Part II: Recommended Approaches and Details of Specific Care Options

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            A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials of neo-adjuvant hormone therapy for localised and locally advanced prostate carcinoma.

            We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials of neo-adjuvant hormone therapy (NHT) in localised and locally advanced prostate cancer to assess the effectiveness of this therapy. We searched MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, Science Citation Index, LILACS and SIGLE for randomised trials comparing NHT plus primary therapy (radiotherapy or prostatectomy) with primary therapy alone. Data included information on study design, participants, interventions, and outcomes. Comparable data were extracted from eligible studies and pooled for meta-analysis with intention to treat principle. NHT prior to prostatectomy did not improve overall or disease-free survival, but did significantly reduce positive margin rates (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.42-0.56, p<0.00001), organ confinement (RR 1.63, 95% CI 1.37-1.95, p<0.0001) and lymph node invasion (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.42-0.56, p<0.02). In one study NHT before radiotherapy significantly improved overall survival for men with Gleason 2-6 (p=0.015). In addition, there was a significant improvement in both clinical disease-free survival (RR 1.46, 95% CI 1.24-1.71, p<0.00001) and biochemical disease-free survival (RR 1.59, 95% CI 1.00-2.55, p=0.05). Toxicities included hot flushes, gastrointestinal, hepatic and miscellaneous adverse events. NHT is associated with significant clinical benefit when given with radiotherapy and improves pathological outcome prior to prostatectomy but is of minimal value prior to radical prostatectomy. The decision to use hormone therapy should be discussed between the patient, the clinician and policy maker based on the benefits, toxicity and cost.
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              Positive Surgical Margins in the 10 Most Common Solid Cancers

              A positive surgical margin (PSM) following cancer resection oftentimes necessitates adjuvant treatments and carries significant financial and prognostic implications. We sought to compare PSM rates for the ten most common solid cancers in the United States, and to assess trends over time. Over 10 million patients were identified in the National Cancer Data Base from 1998–2012, and 6.5 million had surgical margin data. PSM rates were compared between two time periods, 1998–2002 and 2008–2012. PSM was positively correlated with tumor category and grade. Ovarian and prostate cancers had the highest PSM prevalence in women and men, respectively. The highest PSM rates for cancers affecting both genders were seen for oral cavity tumors. PSM rates for breast cancer and lung and bronchus cancer in both men and women declined over the study period. PSM increases were seen for bladder, colon and rectum, and kidney and renal pelvis cancers. This large-scale analysis appraises the magnitude of PSM in the United States in order to focus future efforts on improving oncologic surgical care with the goal of optimizing value and improving patient outcomes.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Medicine (Baltimore)
                Medicine (Baltimore)
                MEDI
                Medicine
                Wolters Kluwer Health
                0025-7974
                1536-5964
                October 2019
                25 October 2019
                : 98
                : 43
                Affiliations
                Department of Urology, Institute of Urology, and National Clinical Research Center for Geriatrics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
                Author notes
                []Correspondence: Pengfei Shen, Department of Urology, Institute of Urology, and National Clinical Research Center for Geriatrics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, No. 37 Guoxue Xiang, Chengdu 610041, China (e-mail: cdhx510@ 123456163.com ).
                Article
                MD-D-19-00586 17633
                10.1097/MD.0000000000017633
                6824749
                31651879
                Copyright © 2019 the Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License 4.0 (CCBY-NC), where it is permissible to download, share, remix, transform, and buildup the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0

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