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      Biodiversity‐mediated effects on ecosystem functioning depend on the type and intensity of environmental disturbances

      1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 1 , 1 , 1 , 5

      Oikos

      Wiley

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          Most cited references 31

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          A framework for community interactions under climate change.

          Predicting the impacts of climate change on species is one of the biggest challenges that ecologists face. Predictions routinely focus on the direct effects of climate change on individual species, yet interactions between species can strongly influence how climate change affects organisms at every scale by altering their individual fitness, geographic ranges and the structure and dynamics of their community. Failure to incorporate these interactions limits the ability to predict responses of species to climate change. We propose a framework based on ideas from global-change biology, community ecology, and invasion biology that uses community modules to assess how species interactions shape responses to climate change. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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            Biodiversity in a complex world: consolidation and progress in functional biodiversity research.

            The global decline of biodiversity caused by human domination of ecosystems worldwide is supposed to alter important process rates and state variables in these ecosystems. However, there is considerable debate on the prevalence and importance of biodiversity effects on ecosystem function (BDEF). Here, we argue that much of the debate stems from two major shortcomings. First, most studies do not directly link the traits leading to increased or decreased function to the traits needed for species coexistence and dominance. We argue that implementing a trait-based approach and broadening the perception of diversity to include trait dissimilarity or trait divergence will result in more realistic predictions on the consequences of altered biodiversity. Second, the empirical and theoretical studies do not reflect the complexity of natural ecosystems, which makes it difficult to transfer the results to natural situations of species loss. We review how different aspects of complexity (trophic structure, multifunctionality, spatial or temporal heterogeneity, and spatial population dynamics) alter our perception of BDEF. We propose future research avenues concisely testing whether acknowledging this complexity will strengthen the observed biodiversity effects. Finally, we propose that a major future task is to disentangle biodiversity effects on ecosystem function from direct changes in function due to human alterations of abiotic constraints.
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              Microcosm Experiments have Limited Relevance for Community and Ecosystem Ecology

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
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                Journal
                Oikos
                Oikos
                Wiley
                0030-1299
                1600-0706
                December 20 2019
                March 2020
                January 22 2020
                March 2020
                : 129
                : 3
                : 433-443
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Depto de Ecologia, Instituto de Biologia, Univ. Federal do Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro RJ Brazil
                [2 ]Int. Inst. for Sustainability Rio de Janeiro RJ Brazil
                [3 ]Univ. do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, IBRAG, Depto de Ecologia Rio de Janeiro RJ Brasil
                [4 ]Fundação Brasileira para o Desenvolvimento Sustentável Rio de Janeiro RJ Brazil
                [5 ]Brazilian Research Network on Climate Change – Rede Clima, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais São José dos Campos SP Brazil
                Article
                10.1111/oik.06768
                © 2020

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