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Processes and patterns of oceanic nutrient limitation

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      Most cited references 88

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      Food security: the challenge of feeding 9 billion people.

      Continuing population and consumption growth will mean that the global demand for food will increase for at least another 40 years. Growing competition for land, water, and energy, in addition to the overexploitation of fisheries, will affect our ability to produce food, as will the urgent requirement to reduce the impact of the food system on the environment. The effects of climate change are a further threat. But the world can produce more food and can ensure that it is used more efficiently and equitably. A multifaceted and linked global strategy is needed to ensure sustainable and equitable food security, different components of which are explored here.
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        Spreading dead zones and consequences for marine ecosystems.

        Dead zones in the coastal oceans have spread exponentially since the 1960s and have serious consequences for ecosystem functioning. The formation of dead zones has been exacerbated by the increase in primary production and consequent worldwide coastal eutrophication fueled by riverine runoff of fertilizers and the burning of fossil fuels. Enhanced primary production results in an accumulation of particulate organic matter, which encourages microbial activity and the consumption of dissolved oxygen in bottom waters. Dead zones have now been reported from more than 400 systems, affecting a total area of more than 245,000 square kilometers, and are probably a key stressor on marine ecosystems.
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          Particulate organic matter flux and planktonic new production in the deep ocean

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            Author and article information

            Journal
            Nature Geoscience
            Nature Geosci
            Springer Nature America, Inc
            1752-0894
            1752-0908
            September 2013
            March 31 2013
            September 2013
            : 6
            : 9
            : 701-710
            10.1038/ngeo1765
            © 2013

            http://www.springer.com/tdm

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