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      Small urban centres as launching sites for plant invasions in natural areas: insights from South Africa

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          A global analysis of the impacts of urbanization on bird and plant diversity reveals key anthropogenic drivers.

          Urbanization contributes to the loss of the world's biodiversity and the homogenization of its biota. However, comparative studies of urban biodiversity leading to robust generalities of the status and drivers of biodiversity in cities at the global scale are lacking. Here, we compiled the largest global dataset to date of two diverse taxa in cities: birds (54 cities) and plants (110 cities). We found that the majority of urban bird and plant species are native in the world's cities. Few plants and birds are cosmopolitan, the most common being Columba livia and Poa annua. The density of bird and plant species (the number of species per km(2)) has declined substantially: only 8% of native bird and 25% of native plant species are currently present compared with estimates of non-urban density of species. The current density of species in cities and the loss in density of species was best explained by anthropogenic features (landcover, city age) rather than by non-anthropogenic factors (geography, climate, topography). As urbanization continues to expand, efforts directed towards the conservation of intact vegetation within urban landscapes could support higher concentrations of both bird and plant species. Despite declines in the density of species, cities still retain endemic native species, thus providing opportunities for regional and global biodiversity conservation, restoration and education.
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            Alien and native species in Central European urban floras: a quantitative comparison

             Petr Pyšek (1998)
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              Roads as Conduits for Exotic Plant Invasions in a Semiarid Landscape

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Biological Invasions
                Biol Invasions
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1387-3547
                1573-1464
                December 2017
                October 25 2017
                December 2017
                : 19
                : 12
                : 3541-3555
                Article
                10.1007/s10530-017-1600-4
                © 2017

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