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      AMPK: Mechanisms of Cellular Energy Sensing and Restoration of Metabolic Balance

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      Molecular Cell
      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          <p class="first" id="P1">AMPK is a highly conserved master regulator of metabolism, which restores energy balance during metabolic stress both at the cellular and physiological levels. The identification of numerous AMPK targets has helped explain how AMPK restores energy homeostasis. Recent advancements, however, demonstrate that regulation of AMPK is also affected by novel contexts, such as subcellular localization and phosphorylation by non-canonical upstream kinases. Notably, the therapeutic potential of AMPK is widely recognized and heavily pursued for treatment of metabolic diseases such as diabetes, but also obesity, inflammation and cancer. Moreover, the recently solved crystal structure of AMPK has shed light both into how nucleotides activate AMPK but, importantly, also into the sites bound by small molecule activators, thus providing a path for improved drugs. </p>

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          Most cited references64

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          AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) action in skeletal muscle via direct phosphorylation of PGC-1alpha.

          Activation of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) in skeletal muscle increases glucose uptake, fatty acid oxidation, and mitochondrial biogenesis by increasing gene expression in these pathways. However, the transcriptional components that are directly targeted by AMPK are still elusive. The peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) has emerged as a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis; furthermore, it has been shown that PGC-1alpha gene expression is induced by exercise and by chemical activation of AMPK in skeletal muscle. Using primary muscle cells and mice deficient in PGC-1alpha, we found that the effects of AMPK on gene expression of glucose transporter 4, mitochondrial genes, and PGC-1alpha itself are almost entirely dependent on the function of PGC-1alpha protein. Furthermore, AMPK phosphorylates PGC-1alpha directly both in vitro and in cells. These direct phosphorylations of the PGC-1alpha protein at threonine-177 and serine-538 are required for the PGC-1alpha-dependent induction of the PGC-1alpha promoter. These data indicate that AMPK phosphorylation of PGC-1alpha initiates many of the important gene regulatory functions of AMPK in skeletal muscle.
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            Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta is an alternative upstream kinase for AMP-activated protein kinase.

            The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical regulator of energy balance at both the cellular and whole-body levels. Two upstream kinases have been reported to activate AMPK in cell-free assays, i.e., the tumor suppressor LKB1 and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase. However, evidence that this is physiologically relevant currently only exists for LKB1. We now report that there is a significant basal activity and phosphorylation of AMPK in LKB1-deficient cells that can be stimulated by Ca2+ ionophores, and studies using the CaMKK inhibitor STO-609 and isoform-specific siRNAs show that CaMKKbeta is required for this effect. CaMKKbeta also activates AMPK much more rapidly than CaMKKalpha in cell-free assays. K(+)-induced depolarization in rat cerebrocortical slices, which increases intracellular Ca2+ without disturbing cellular adenine nucleotide levels, activates AMPK, and this is blocked by STO-609. Our results suggest a potential Ca(2+)-dependent neuroprotective pathway involving phosphorylation and activation of AMPK by CaMKKbeta.
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              Differential regulation of distinct Vps34 complexes by AMPK in nutrient stress and autophagy.

              Autophagy is a stress response protecting cells from unfavorable conditions, such as nutrient starvation. The class III phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, Vps34, forms multiple complexes and regulates both intracellular vesicle trafficking and autophagy induction. Here, we show that AMPK plays a key role in regulating different Vps34 complexes. AMPK inhibits the nonautophagy Vps34 complex by phosphorylating T163/S165 in Vps34 and therefore suppresses overall PI(3)P production and protects cells from starvation. In parallel, AMPK activates the proautophagy Vps34 complex by phosphorylating S91/S94 in Beclin1 to induce autophagy. Atg14L, an autophagy-essential gene present only in the proautophagy Vps34 complex, inhibits Vps34 phosphorylation but increases Beclin1 phosphorylation by AMPK. As such, Atg14L dictates the differential regulation (either inhibition or activation) of different Vps34 complexes in response to glucose starvation. Our study reveals an intricate molecular regulation of Vps34 complexes by AMPK in nutrient stress response and autophagy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Molecular Cell
                Molecular Cell
                Elsevier BV
                10972765
                June 2017
                June 2017
                : 66
                : 6
                : 789-800
                Article
                10.1016/j.molcel.2017.05.032
                5553560
                28622524
                c563a5b0-073a-4063-815d-6695e5978339
                © 2017
                History

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