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      A new species of the genus Henricia (Asteroidea, Spinulosida, Echinasteridae) from South Korea

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          Abstract

          A new species of the genus Henricia Gray, 1840 that belongs to the family Echinasteridae is described from South Korea. Henricia epiphysialis sp. nov. has epiphyseal ossicles at the ends of the abactinal and lateral plates, and the abactinal and lateral spines form a hooked crown. The partial sequence of the mitochondrial COXI gene (537 bp) of H. epiphysialis sp. nov. was obtained, and the new species was morphologically and genetically compared with other related Henricia species.

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          Most cited references 18

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          MEGA7: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis Version 7.0 for Bigger Datasets.

          We present the latest version of the Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis (Mega) software, which contains many sophisticated methods and tools for phylogenomics and phylomedicine. In this major upgrade, Mega has been optimized for use on 64-bit computing systems for analyzing larger datasets. Researchers can now explore and analyze tens of thousands of sequences in Mega The new version also provides an advanced wizard for building timetrees and includes a new functionality to automatically predict gene duplication events in gene family trees. The 64-bit Mega is made available in two interfaces: graphical and command line. The graphical user interface (GUI) is a native Microsoft Windows application that can also be used on Mac OS X. The command line Mega is available as native applications for Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. They are intended for use in high-throughput and scripted analysis. Both versions are available from www.megasoftware.net free of charge.
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            DNA primers for amplification of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I from diverse metazoan invertebrates.

            We describe "universal" DNA primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a 710-bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (COI) from 11 invertebrate phyla: Echinodermata, Mollusca, Annelida, Pogonophora, Arthropoda, Nemertinea, Echiura, Sipuncula, Platyhelminthes, Tardigrada, and Coelenterata, as well as the putative phylum Vestimentifera. Preliminary comparisons revealed that these COI primers generate informative sequences for phylogenetic analyses at the species and higher taxonomic levels.
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              Biological identifications through DNA barcodes.

              Although much biological research depends upon species diagnoses, taxonomic expertise is collapsing. We are convinced that the sole prospect for a sustainable identification capability lies in the construction of systems that employ DNA sequences as taxon 'barcodes'. We establish that the mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) can serve as the core of a global bioidentification system for animals. First, we demonstrate that COI profiles, derived from the low-density sampling of higher taxonomic categories, ordinarily assign newly analysed taxa to the appropriate phylum or order. Second, we demonstrate that species-level assignments can be obtained by creating comprehensive COI profiles. A model COI profile, based upon the analysis of a single individual from each of 200 closely allied species of lepidopterans, was 100% successful in correctly identifying subsequent specimens. When fully developed, a COI identification system will provide a reliable, cost-effective and accessible solution to the current problem of species identification. Its assembly will also generate important new insights into the diversification of life and the rules of molecular evolution.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Zookeys
                Zookeys
                2
                urn:lsid:arphahub.com:pub:45048D35-BB1D-5CE8-9668-537E44BD4C7E
                urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:91BD42D4-90F1-4B45-9350-EEF175B1727A
                ZooKeys
                Pensoft Publishers
                1313-2989
                1313-2970
                2020
                25 November 2020
                : 997
                : 1-15
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Animal Biotechnology & Resource, Sahmyook University, Seoul 01795, South Korea
                [2 ] Marine Biological Resource Institute, Sahmyook University, Seoul 01795, South Korea
                [3 ] Division of Ecological Conservation, Bureau of Ecological Research, National Institute of Ecology, Seocheon-gun, Choongnam 33657, South Korea
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Sook Shin ( shins@ 123456syu.ac.kr )

                Academic editor: A. Martynov

                Article
                52703
                10.3897/zookeys.997.52703
                7710672
                Michael Dadole Ubagan, Taekjun Lee, Philjae Kim, Sook Shin

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Categories
                Research Article
                Asteroidea
                Echinasteridae
                Spinulosida
                Biodiversity & Conservation
                Evolutionary biology
                Cenozoic
                Asia

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