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      Photopic negative response versus pattern electroretinogram in early glaucoma.

      Investigative ophthalmology & visual science

      Aged, Diagnostic Techniques, Ophthalmological, standards, Disease Progression, Early Diagnosis, Electroretinography, methods, Female, Glaucoma, diagnosis, physiopathology, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Ocular Hypertension, Photic Stimulation, Pupil, physiology, ROC Curve, Reproducibility of Results, Retinal Ganglion Cells, Sensitivity and Specificity, Visual Fields

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          Abstract

          Photopic negative response (PhNR) and pattern electroretinogram (PERG) are electrophysiological markers of retinal ganglion cell function; both are reduced in glaucoma. We compared PhNR and PERG in different stages of the disease. Eleven eyes with preperimetric glaucoma (glaucomatous optic disc with normal field); 18 with manifest glaucoma; and 26 normals were included. We obtained PhNR (flash strength from 0.1-4 cd·s/m(2)) and steady-state PERG and analyzed PhNR amplitude (baseline to 72 ms trough); PhNR/b-wave ratio; PERG amplitude; and PERG ratio (0.8°/16°). Identification of PhNR structure was only reliable ≥1 cd·s/m(2) flash strength; amplitude and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) area under curve (AUC) changed little from 1 to 4 cd·s/m(2). Both PhNR and PERG (amplitude and ratio) were reduced in preperimetric and more so in manifest glaucoma. AUCs based on PhNR/PERG amplitudes were not significantly different from chance in preperimetric glaucoma (AUCs 0.61/0.59), but were significant in manifest glaucoma (0.78/0.76); ratios were significant in both glaucoma groups (0.80/0.73 and 0.80/0.79). In spite of that, PhNR ratio and PERG ratio were not significantly correlated (r = 0.22 across all groups); an ROC based on a combination of both reached AUCs of 0.85/0.90 for preperimetric/manifest glaucoma. Both PhNR and PERG performed similarly to detect glaucoma; for both, ratios performed better than amplitudes. The PhNR has the advantage of not requiring clear optics and refractive correction; the PERG has the advantage of being recorded with natural pupils.

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          Journal
          23307968
          10.1167/iovs.12-11201

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