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      Implicit and explicit memory in children with congenital and acquired brain disorder.

      1 ,

      Neuropsychology

      American Psychological Association (APA)

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          Abstract

          Implicit and explicit memory were examined in 8- to 15-year-old children with myelomeningocele and shunted hydrocephalus, severe traumatic brain injuries, or orthopedic injuries. Each group included between 22 and 29 children. Children completed a fragmented picture identification task to assess perceptual priming and a semantic decision-making task to assess conceptual priming. Each task also assessed procedural learning as well as explicit recall and recognition. All 3 groups showed significant perceptual and semantic priming of similar magnitude. In contrast, both brain-disordered groups displayed poorer explicit memory than did the comparison group. No group showed significant procedural learning on either task. Age and IQ were stronger predictors of explicit recall than of implicit memory. The findings indicate that implicit memory is relatively intact in many children with congenital and acquired brain disorders, despite deficits in explicit memory, and support the existence of separate memory systems in children.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Neuropsychology
          Neuropsychology
          American Psychological Association (APA)
          0894-4105
          0894-4105
          Sep 2005
          : 19
          : 5
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Pediatrics, Ohio State University and Center for Biobehavioral Health, Columbus Children's Research Institute, Columbus, OH 43205, USA. yeatesk@chi.osu.edu
          Article
          2005-11412-007
          10.1037/0894-4105.19.5.618
          16187880

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