Blog
About

3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Targeting Tyrosine Phosphatases by 3-Bromopyruvate Overcomes Hyperactivation of Platelets from Gastrointestinal Cancer Patients

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is one of the most common causes of cancer related mortality. It has been speculated that hypercoagulation in cancer patients is triggered by direct or indirect contact of platelets with tumor cells, however the underlying molecular mechanisms involved are currently unknown. Unraveling these mechanisms may provide potential avenues for preventing platelet-tumor cell aggregation. Here, we investigated the role of protein tyrosine phosphatases in the functionality of platelets in both healthy individuals and patients with gastrointestinal cancer, and determined their use as a target to inhibit platelet hyperactivity. This is the first study to demonstrate that platelet agonists selectively activate low molecular weight protein tyrosine phosphatase (LMWPTP) and PTP1B, resulting in activation of Src, a tyrosine kinase known to contribute to several platelet functions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these phosphatases are a target for 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP), a lactic acid analog currently investigated for its use in the treatment of various metabolic tumors. Our data indicate that 3-BP reduces Src activity, platelet aggregation, expression of platelet activation makers and platelet-tumor cell interaction. Thus, in addition to its anti-carcinogenic effects, 3-BP may also be effective in preventing platelet-tumor cell aggregationin cancer patients and therefore may reduce cancer mortality by limiting VTE in patients.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 48

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Initial steps of metastasis: Cell invasion and endothelial transmigration

          Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer mortality. The metastatic cascade represents a multi-step process which includes local tumor cell invasion, entry into the vasculature followed by the exit of carcinoma cells from the circulation and colonization at the distal sites. At the earliest stage of successful cancer cell dissemination, the primary cancer adapts the secondary site of tumor colonization involving the tumor–stroma crosstalk. The migration and plasticity of cancer cells as well as the surrounding environment such as stromal and endothelial cells are mandatory. Consequently, the mechanisms of cell movement are of utmost relevance for targeted intervention of which three different types have been reported. Tumor cells can migrate either collectively, in a mesenchymal or in an amoeboid type of movement and intravasate the blood or lymph vasculature. Intravasation by the interaction of tumor cells with the vascular endothelium is mechanistically poorly understood. Changes in the epithelial plasticity enable carcinoma cells to switch between these types of motility. The types of migration may change depending on the intervention thereby increasing the velocity and aggressiveness of invading cancer cells. Interference with collective or mesenchymal cell invasion by targeting integrin expression or metalloproteinase activity, respectively, resulted in an amoeboid cell phenotype as the ultimate exit strategy of cancer cells. There are little mechanistic details reported in vivo showing that the amoeboid behavior can be either reversed or efficiently inhibited. Future concepts of metastasis intervention must simultaneously address the collective, mesenchymal and amoeboid mechanisms of cell invasion in order to advance in anti-metastatic strategies as these different types of movement can coexist and cooperate. Beyond the targeting of cell movements, the adhesion of cancer cells to the stroma in heterotypic circulating tumor cell emboli is of paramount relevance for anti-metastatic therapy.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            RNA-Seq of Tumor-Educated Platelets Enables Blood-Based Pan-Cancer, Multiclass, and Molecular Pathway Cancer Diagnostics

            Summary Tumor-educated blood platelets (TEPs) are implicated as central players in the systemic and local responses to tumor growth, thereby altering their RNA profile. We determined the diagnostic potential of TEPs by mRNA sequencing of 283 platelet samples. We distinguished 228 patients with localized and metastasized tumors from 55 healthy individuals with 96% accuracy. Across six different tumor types, the location of the primary tumor was correctly identified with 71% accuracy. Also, MET or HER2-positive, and mutant KRAS, EGFR, or PIK3CA tumors were accurately distinguished using surrogate TEP mRNA profiles. Our results indicate that blood platelets provide a valuable platform for pan-cancer, multiclass cancer, and companion diagnostics, possibly enabling clinical advances in blood-based “liquid biopsies”.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              THE AGGREGATION OF BLOOD PLATELETS.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Clin Med
                J Clin Med
                jcm
                Journal of Clinical Medicine
                MDPI
                2077-0383
                28 June 2019
                July 2019
                : 8
                : 7
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
                [2 ]Department of Biochemistry and Tissue Biology, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, Campinas 13083-862, SP, Brazil
                [3 ]PlateInnove Biotechnology, 13414-018 Piracicaba, SP, Brazil
                [4 ]Department of Hematology, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: carmenv@ 123456unicamp.br (C.V.F.-H.); g.fuhler@ 123456erasmusmc.nl (G.M.F.); Tel.: +55-(19)-3521-6659 (C.V.F.-H.); +31-(0)107032759 (G.M.F.)
                Article
                jcm-08-00936
                10.3390/jcm8070936
                6678874
                31261776
                © 2019 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article