7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Role of Prenatal Characteristics and Early Growth on Pubertal Attainment of British Girls

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          OBJECTIVES

          The objective of this study was to explore the influence of maternal prenatal characteristics and behaviors and of weight and BMI gain during early childhood on the timing of various puberty outcomes in girls who were enrolled in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children.

          METHODS

          Repeated self-assessments of pubertal development were obtained from ~4000 girls between the ages of 8 and 14. Data on prenatal characteristics and weight at birth and 2,9, and 20 months of age were obtained from questionnaires, birth records, and clinic visits. Infants’ weights were converted to weight-for-age and BMI SD scores (SDSs; z scores), and change values were obtained for the 0- to 20-month and other intervals within that age range. We used parametric survival models to estimate associations with age of entry into Tanner stages of breast and pubic hair and menarche.

          RESULTS

          Maternal initiation of menarche at age <12, smoking during pregnancy, and primiparity were associated with earlier puberty. A 1-unit increase in the weight SDS change values for the 0-to 20-month age interval was associated with earlier ages of entry into pubertal outcomes (0.19–0.31 years). Increases in the BMI SDS change values were also associated with earlier entry into pubertal outcomes (0.07– 0.11 years).

          CONCLUSIONS

          Many of the maternal prenatal characteristics and weight and BMI gain during infancy seemed to have similar influences across different puberty outcomes. Either such early factors have comparable influences on each of the hormonal processes involved in puberty, or processes are linked and awakening of 1 aspect triggers the others.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          0376422
          6405
          Pediatrics
          Pediatrics
          Pediatrics
          0031-4005
          1098-4275
          4 August 2017
          09 August 2010
          September 2010
          31 August 2017
          : 126
          : 3
          : e591-e600
          Affiliations
          [a ]National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
          [b ]Epidemiology Department, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia
          [c ]Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, England
          [d ]MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, Cambridge, England
          [e ]Centre for Child and Adolescent Health, Department of Community Based Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, England
          Author notes
          Address correspondence to Mildred Maisonet, PhD, Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, 1518 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30322. mmaison@ 123456sph.emory.edu
          Article
          PMC5578444 PMC5578444 5578444 nihpa896740
          10.1542/peds.2009-2636
          5578444
          20696722
          Categories
          Article

          ALSPAC, Tanner stages, postnatal growth, obesity, puberty

          Comments

          Comment on this article