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      Religiosity and Social Capital as Prevention of Socio-Pathological Phenomena

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      Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
      Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention

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          Abstract

          According to M. Fforde, the era of postmodernity is characterized by a form of cultural collapse as it reveals many phenomena indicating that human in contemporary society is directed towards “desocialization.” This process represents an overall cultural shift as well as a change in the models of human. These are the main factors of the cultural crisis (Kuna, 2006). This paper is dedicated to an analysis of the issue of religion as social capital in conditions of increasing societal risks. We work with an hypothesis that socio-pathological phenomena are rather determined by cultural and secularization factors.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
          cswhi
          Journal of Clinical Social Work and Health Intervention
          2222386X
          20769741
          December 31 2020
          December 29 2020
          December 31 2020
          December 29 2020
          : 11
          : 4
          : 51-56
          Article
          10.22359/cswhi_11_4_07
          c77d7b90-2d4d-40e4-a6e0-9f0f4328fbcf
          © 2020

          This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/


          Psychology,Social & Behavioral Sciences
          Psychology, Social & Behavioral Sciences

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