4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      An early indicator of drug success: Top Journal Selectivity Index

      Drug Design, Development and Therapy

      Dove Medical Press

      bibliometrics, ‘me-too’ drugs, pharmaceutical market, scientometrics

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The Top Journal Selectivity Index (TJSI) is a scientometric index reflecting the potential importance of a new drug. It represents the ratio of the number of all types of articles on a particular drug in the top 20 journals relative to the number of articles in all (>5,000) biomedical journals covered by Medline over the 5 years since the drug’s introduction. The TJSI can be an indicator of a drug’s potential for sustained use: a higher score increases the probability of continuing success.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 15

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          The Truth About the Drug Companies: How They Deceive Us and What to Do About It

           M. ANGELL,  M Angell (2004)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Can literature analysis identify innovation drivers in drug discovery?

            Key Points Drug discovery has traditionally responded to the 'pull' of unmet medical need and commercial potential. Here, we evaluate the scientific areas that are providing 'push' in terms of scientific innovation, as measured by publications and patents. The amount of funding from the US National Institutes of Health, the number of doctoral degrees awarded, the number of publications and the number of approvals for new molecular entities issued by the US Food and Drug Administration show a general upward trend from the 1950s to the present. Although explanations can be suggested for some of the short-term ups and downs, these trends are also affected by numerous hidden variables, and well as time lags, feedback loops and other complications. The numbers of publications in various disease areas correlate well with global disease burden.The correlation is greater in the developed world, where the impact of infectious and parasitic diseases, respiratory infections and infant mortality, is considerably lower than in the developing world. A few therapeutic areas stand out when analysing trends in publications, citations, publications in high-impact journals and patents. Oncology is the clearest outlier on almost every metric. Viruses, nutrition and metabolism, and the immune system also show increases in the majority of metrics. In terms of individual diseases, insulin resistance, orthomyxoviridae infections, depression, autism, macular degeneration, inflammation, obesity, cognitive disorders and ventricular dysfunction have strong publication growth in both 2- and 5-year periods. Publications related to the genes encoding forkhead box P3, leucine-rich repeat kinase 2, janus kinase 2, transcription factor 7-like 2, interleukin-17A, toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4, FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin associated protein 1and ADIPOQ (adiponectin, C1Q and collagen domain-containing) show the strongest publication growth in the same periods. Assessing scientific innovation is a complex endeavour; however, the 'bibliome' seems to offer many approaches that could enhance decision-making in drug discovery. Supplementary information The online version of this article (doi:10.1038/nrd2973) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Competitiveness in follow-on drug R&D: a race or imitation?

              The development of 'follow on' or 'me too' drugs - generally defined as a drug with a similar chemical structure or the same mechanism of action as a drug that is already marketed - has attracted contrasting views. Some have argued that follow-on drugs often provide useful alternative or enhanced therapeutic options for particular patients or patient subpopulations, as well as introducing price competition. Others, however, consider that the development of such drugs is duplicative and that the resources needed would be better directed elsewhere. Implicit in some of this criticism is the notion that the development of me-too drugs is undertaken after a first-in-class drug has made it to market and proved commercially successful. In this Perspective, using analysis of development and patent filing histories of entrants to new drug classes in the past five decades, we provide new evidence that the development of multiple new drugs in a given class is better characterized as a race, rather than the imitation of successful products.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2013
                13 February 2013
                : 7
                : 93-98
                Affiliations
                Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Igor Kissin Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Anesthesia, MRB, Boston, MA 02115, USA Tel +1 617 732 5052 Fax +1 617 734 0682 Email kissin@ 123456zeus.bwh.harvard.edu
                Article
                dddt-7-093
                10.2147/DDDT.S37324
                3575128
                23430968
                © 2013 Kissin, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd

                This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Review

                Comments

                Comment on this article