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      The influence on perceptions of truthfulness of the emotional expressions shown when talking about failure

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          Abstract

          The study aimed to assess whether showing emotion in an organizational inquiry into failure affects perceptions of truthfulness as a function of the match between the explanation of what caused the failure and the emotion expressed. Two web-based studies were conducted. Participants with work experience saw videos of an inquiry and rated the protagonist’s truthfulness. In both studies protagonists who expressed an emotion (anger or shame) were rated as less truthful than protagonists who expressed no emotion, regardless of what the failure was attributed to. In order to not confound effects of emotions with occupational stereotype effects only male protagonists were shown. Showing emotions when questioned is normal. Managers have to be aware of a tendency to count this against the employee. This is the only research focusing on the effects of showing emotions on perceptions of truthfulness in an organizational context.

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          Most cited references33

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          Emotion in the Workplace: A Reappraisal

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            Cues to deception.

            Do people behave differently when they are lying compared with when they are telling the truth? The combined results of 1,338 estimates of 158 cues to deception are reported. Results show that in some ways, liars are less forthcoming than truth tellers, and they tell less compelling tales. They also make a more negative impression and are more tense. Their stories include fewer ordinary imperfections and unusual contents. However, many behaviors showed no discernible links, or only weak links, to deceit. Cues to deception were more pronounced when people were motivated to succeed, especially when the motivations were identity relevant rather than monetary or material. Cues to deception were also stronger when lies were about transgressions.
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              Interpersonal Processes Involving Impression Regulation and Management

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                EJOP
                Eur J Psychol
                Europe's Journal of Psychology
                Eur. J. Psychol.
                PsychOpen
                1841-0413
                27 February 2015
                : 11
                : 1
                : 125-138
                Affiliations
                [a ]Graduate School of Management, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
                [b ]The Interdisciplinary Center for Research on Emotions, Haifa, Israel
                [c ]Humboldt-University, Berlin, Germany
                [4]University of South Wales, Newport, United Kingdom
                Author notes
                [* ]Graduate School of Management, University of Haifa, Haifa, 31905, Israel. shlomo@ 123456yuvalalon.co.il
                Article
                ejop.v11i1.877
                10.5964/ejop.v11i1.877
                4873098
                27247646
                c7c2b8f2-fcde-4166-9d6c-9c05f5c81747
                Copyright @

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                History
                : 28 October 2014
                : 04 January 2015
                Categories
                Research Reports

                Psychology
                perceived truthfulness,emotions,organizational inquiry
                Psychology
                perceived truthfulness, emotions, organizational inquiry

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