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      Fluocinolone acetonide intravitreal implant for the treatment of diabetic macular edema

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          Abstract

          Diabetic macular edema (DME) remains one of the leading causes of moderate to severe vision loss. Although laser photocoagulation was the standard of care for several years, few patients achieved significant improvements in visual acuity. As a result, several pharmacotherapies and surgeries have been investigated. The fluocinolone acetonide devices are one of the latest therapies considered for the treatment of DME. Despite bringing significant improvements in visual acuity, fluocinolone devices are associated with cataract formation, increased intraocular pressure (IOP), and surgery to lower IOP. Due to the risk of complications, fluocinolone acetonide devices should be considered only in cases refractive to first-line therapies. In this review, we evaluate current and emerging therapies for DME, with special emphasis on fluocinolone acetonide intravitreal devices.

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          Most cited references 48

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          Photocoagulation for diabetic macular edema. Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study report number 1. Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study research group.

          (1985)
          Data from the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) show that focal photocoagulation of "clinically significant" diabetic macular edema substantially reduces the risk of visual loss. Focal treatment also increases the chance of visual improvement, decreases the frequency of persistent macular edema, and causes only minor visual field losses. In this randomized clinical trial, which was supported by the National Eye Institute, 754 eyes that had macular edema and mild to moderate diabetic retinopathy were randomly assigned to focal argon laser photocoagulation, while 1,490 such eyes were randomly assigned to deferral of photocoagulation. The beneficial effects of treatment demonstrated in this trial suggest that all eyes with clinically significant diabetic macular edema should be considered for focal photocoagulation. Clinically significant macular edema is defined as retinal thickening that involves or threatens the center of the macula (even if visual acuity is not yet reduced) and is assessed by stereo contact lens biomicroscopy or stereo photography. Follow-up of all ETDRS patients continues without other modifications in the study protocol.
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            Randomized trial evaluating ranibizumab plus prompt or deferred laser or triamcinolone plus prompt laser for diabetic macular edema.

            Evaluate intravitreal 0.5 mg ranibizumab or 4 mg triamcinolone combined with focal/grid laser compared with focal/grid laser alone for treatment of diabetic macular edema (DME). Multicenter, randomized clinical trial. A total of 854 study eyes of 691 participants with visual acuity (approximate Snellen equivalent) of 20/32 to 20/320 and DME involving the fovea. Eyes were randomized to sham injection + prompt laser (n=293), 0.5 mg ranibizumab + prompt laser (n=187), 0.5 mg ranibizumab + deferred (> or =24 weeks) laser (n=188), or 4 mg triamcinolone + prompt laser (n=186). Retreatment followed an algorithm facilitated by a web-based, real-time data-entry system. Best-corrected visual acuity and safety at 1 year. The 1-year mean change (+/-standard deviation) in the visual acuity letter score from baseline was significantly greater in the ranibizumab + prompt laser group (+9+/-11, P<0.001) and ranibizumab + deferred laser group (+9+/-12, P<0.001) but not in the triamcinolone + prompt laser group (+4+/-13, P=0.31) compared with the sham + prompt laser group (+3+/-13). Reduction in mean central subfield thickness in the triamcinolone + prompt laser group was similar to both ranibizumab groups and greater than in the sham + prompt laser group. In the subset of pseudophakic eyes at baseline (n=273), visual acuity improvement in the triamcinolone + prompt laser group appeared comparable to that in the ranibizumab groups. No systemic events attributable to study treatment were apparent. Three eyes (0.8%) had injection-related endophthalmitis in the ranibizumab groups, whereas elevated intraocular pressure and cataract surgery were more frequent in the triamcinolone + prompt laser group. Two-year visual acuity outcomes were similar to 1-year outcomes. Intravitreal ranibizumab with prompt or deferred laser is more effective through at least 1 year compared with prompt laser alone for the treatment of DME involving the central macula. Ranibizumab as applied in this study, although uncommonly associated with endophthalmitis, should be considered for patients with DME and characteristics similar to those in this clinical trial. In pseudophakic eyes, intravitreal triamcinolone + prompt laser seems more effective than laser alone but frequently increases the risk of intraocular pressure elevation. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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              The Wisconsin epidemiologic study of diabetic retinopathy. III. Prevalence and risk of diabetic retinopathy when age at diagnosis is 30 or more years.

              In a population-based study in southern Wisconsin, 1,370 patients given diagnoses of diabetes at age 30 years or older were examined using standard protocols to determine the prevalence and severity of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk variables. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy varied from 28.8% in persons who had diabetes for less than five years to 77.8% in persons who had diabetes for 15 or more years. The rate of proliferative diabetic retinopathy varied from 2.0% in persons who had diabetes for less than five years to 15.5% in persons who had diabetes for 15 or more years. By using the Cox regression model, the severity of retinopathy was found to be related to longer duration of diabetes, younger age at diagnosis, higher glycosylated hemoglobin levels, higher systolic BP, use of insulin, presence of proteinuria, and small body mass.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2013
                24 May 2013
                : 7
                : 425-434
                Affiliations
                Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Christina Flaxel, Casey Eye Institute, 3375 SW Terwilliger Blvd, Portland, OR 97239, USA, Tel +1 503 418 3352, Fax +1 503 494 7233, Email flaxelc@ 123456ohsu.edu
                Article
                dddt-7-425
                10.2147/DDDT.S44427
                3668088
                23737661
                © 2013 Messenger et al, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.

                This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

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