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      Reducing the health effects of hot weather and heat extremes: from personal cooling strategies to green cities

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          Heat stress and public health: a critical review.

          Heat is an environmental and occupational hazard. The prevention of deaths in the community caused by extreme high temperatures (heat waves) is now an issue of public health concern. The risk of heat-related mortality increases with natural aging, but persons with particular social and/or physical vulnerability are also at risk. Important differences in vulnerability exist between populations, depending on climate, culture, infrastructure (housing), and other factors. Public health measures include health promotion and heat wave warning systems, but the effectiveness of acute measures in response to heat waves has not yet been formally evaluated. Climate change will increase the frequency and the intensity of heat waves, and a range of measures, including improvements to housing, management of chronic diseases, and institutional care of the elderly and the vulnerable, will need to be developed to reduce health impacts.
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            Hierarchically porous polymer coatings for highly efficient passive daytime radiative cooling

            Passive daytime radiative cooling (PDRC) involves spontaneously cooling a surface by reflecting sunlight and radiating heat to the cold outer space. Current PDRC designs are promising alternatives to electrical cooling, but are either inefficient or have limited applicability. We present a simple, inexpensive and scalable phase-inversion-based method for fabricating hierarchically porous poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropene) (P(VdF-HFP)HP) coatings with excellent PDRC capability. High, substrate-independent hemispherical solar reflectances (0.96 ± 0.03) and long-wave infrared (LWIR) emittances (0.97 ± 0.02) allow for sub-ambient temperature drops of ~6°C and cooling powers of ~96 W m–2 under solar intensities of 890 and 750 W m–2 respectively. The performance equals or surpasses those of state-of-the-art PDRC designs, while the technique offers a paint-like simplicity.
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              The Imperative for Climate Action to Protect Health

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Lancet
                The Lancet
                Elsevier BV
                01406736
                August 2021
                August 2021
                : 398
                : 10301
                : 709-724
                Article
                10.1016/S0140-6736(21)01209-5
                34419206
                c8311705-ae84-4125-a5fe-e9de0f5d15d9
                © 2021

                https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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