1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Biomimetic Curvature and Tension-Driven Membrane Fusion Induced by Silica Nanoparticles.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Fusion events in living cells are intricate phenomena that require the coordinate action of multicomponent protein complexes. However, simpler synthetic tools to control membrane fusion in artificial cells are highly desirable. Native membrane fusion machinery mediates fusion, driving a delicate balance of membrane curvature and tension between two closely apposed membranes. Here, we show that silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs) at a size close to the cross-over between tension-driven and curvature-driven interaction regimes initiate efficient fusion of biomimetic model membranes. Fusion efficiency and mechanisms are studied by Förster resonance energy transfer and confocal fluorescence microscopy. SiO2 NPs induce a slight increase in lipid packing likely to increase the lateral tension of the membrane. We observe a connection between membrane tension and fusion efficiency. Finally, real-time confocal fluorescence microscopy reveals three distinct mechanistic pathways for membrane fusion. SiO2 NPs show significant potential for inclusion in the synthetic biology toolkit for membrane remodeling and fusion in artificial cells.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Langmuir
          Langmuir : the ACS journal of surfaces and colloids
          American Chemical Society (ACS)
          1520-5827
          0743-7463
          Nov 30 2021
          : 37
          : 47
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology and School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, U.K.
          [2 ] Bragg Centre for Materials Research, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, U.K.
          Article
          10.1021/acs.langmuir.1c02492
          34788054
          c8cd0537-b1ce-4357-a4e7-6ec18ca4a46d
          History

          Comments

          Comment on this article