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Use of Subdural Evacuating Port System Following Open Craniotomy with Excision of Native Dura and Membranes for Management of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

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      Abstract

      An 86-year-old woman was admitted to the intensive care unit with a chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) and rapid onset of worsening neurological symptoms. She was taken to the operating room for a mini-craniotomy for evacuation of the CSDH including excision of the dura and CSDH membrane. Postoperatively, a subdural evacuation port system (SEPS) was integrated into the craniotomy site and left in place rather than a traditional subdural catheter drain to evacuate the subdural space postoperatively. The patient had a good recovery and improvement of symptoms after evacuation and remained clinically well after the SEPS was removed. We offer the technique of dura and CSDH membrane excision plus SEPS drain as an effective postoperative alternative to the standard craniotomy leaving the native dura intact with traditional subdural drain that overlies the cortical surface of the brain in treating patients with CSDH.

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      Most cited references 5

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      Use of drains versus no drains after burr-hole evacuation of chronic subdural haematoma: a randomised controlled trial.

      Chronic subdural haematoma causes serious morbidity and mortality. It recurs after surgical evacuation in 5-30% of patients. Drains might reduce recurrence but are not used routinely. Our aim was to investigate the effect of drains on recurrence rates and clinical outcomes. We did a randomised controlled trial at one UK centre between November, 2004, and November, 2007. 269 patients aged 18 years and older with a chronic subdural haematoma for burr-hole drainage were assessed for eligibility. 108 were randomly assigned by block randomisation to receive a drain inserted into the subdural space and 107 to no drain after evacuation. The primary endpoint was recurrence needing redrainage. The trial was stopped early because of a significant benefit in reduction of recurrence. Analyses were done on an intention-to-treat basis. This study is registered with the International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Register (ISRCTN 97314294). Recurrence occurred in ten of 108 (9.3%) people with a drain, and 26 of 107 (24%) without (p=0.003; 95% CI 0.14-0.70). At 6 months mortality was nine of 105 (8.6%) and 19 of 105 (18.1%), respectively (p=0.042; 95% CI 0.1-0.99). Medical and surgical complications were much the same between the study groups. Use of a drain after burr-hole drainage of chronic subdural haematoma is safe and associated with reduced recurrence and mortality at 6 months. Academy of Medical Sciences, Health Foundation, and NIHR Biomedical Research Centre (Neurosciences Theme).
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        Chronic subdural haematoma: modern management and emerging therapies.

        Chronic subdural haematoma (CSDH) is one of the most common neurological disorders, and is especially prevalent among elderly individuals. Surgical evacuation is the mainstay of management for symptomatic patients or haematomas exerting significant mass effect. Although burr hole craniostomy is the most widely practised technique worldwide, approximately 10-20% of surgically treated patients experience postoperative recurrence necessitating reoperation. Given the increasing incidence of CSDH in a growing elderly population, a need exists for refined techniques that combine a minimally invasive approach with clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness. In addition, nonsurgical treatment modalities, such as steroids, are attracting considerable interest, as they have the potential to reduce postoperative recurrence or even replace the need for surgery in selected patients. This Review provides an overview of the contemporary management of CSDH and presents considerations regarding future approaches that could further optimize patient care and outcomes.
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          Chronic subdural haematomas and anticoagulation or anti-thrombotic therapy.

          Eighty-one cases of chronic subdural haematomas (CSDH) admitted to the neurosurgical unit of the Royal Hobart Hospital, Tasmania, Australia, over a 5-year period were reviewed. The use of anticoagulant therapy as a causative agent in the development of CSDH was investigated. We suspected a high incidence of anticoagulant or anti-thrombotic therapy. We found that anticoagulant therapy was used by a significant percentage of CSDH patients. In the patient group presenting to our unit the risk of developing a CSDH was at least 42.5 times higher in warfarinised patients and also increased for patients on aspirin, although this risk could not be quantified.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ] Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco
            [2 ] School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
            Author notes
            Journal
            Cureus
            Cureus
            2168-8184
            Cureus
            Cureus (Palo Alto (CA) )
            2168-8184
            26 April 2017
            April 2017
            : 9
            : 4
            5446221 10.7759/cureus.1197
            Copyright © 2017, Cage et al.

            This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

            Categories
            Neurosurgery

            subdural drain, craniotomy, subdural hematoma

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